Closing vast gender gap ending child marriage key priorities Ghanaian President tells

“Most of the world’s poorest people are women,” John Dramani Mahama said. “Currently we create programs and policies to address this imbalance, yet regardless of how successful they may be, they are not permanent solutions. They do not solve the ultimate problem, which is the vast inequality between men and women that so many traditions have inculcated.”He also addressed the plight of children and the work his country is doing to address their needs.“In order to address the issue of child mortality and malnutrition, preparatory work is underway to earmark disbursements for pregnant women and mothers of children under the age of one,” he said.He noted the central role of education in achieving gender parity, emphasizing that it was “the key to change.”“In Ghana, we have made tremendous progress in achieving the Millennium Development Goal target on universal basic education. We instituted the ‘Girl Child Program,’ which encourages parents to send girls to school, and at the primary level we have achieved gender parity between boys and girls,” he said.Turning to the practice of child marriage on the continent, Mr. Mahama highlighted that, in West Africa, two out of five girls are married before they turn 18, face increased maternal mortality rates and “are subject to the sort of poverty that is nearly insurmountable.”“Ghana has launched a campaign, under the auspices of [the UN Children’s Fund] to end child marriage in our nation by focusing not only on getting young girls in school but also on keeping them there their education is complete,” he continued. “This is being achieved through enhanced access to secondary education and beyond without compromising quality.”On UN reform, he emphasized that it was time “for greater inclusivity in the United Nations.”“The world that was in 1945 does not exist now in 2015,” he continued, “so the visionary Organization that was formed to meet the needs of that world must now be reformed to meet the needs of this one.”He also delineated those needs, among them the issues caused by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), Boko Haram and Al-Qaida, as well to address the situatio of those killed in the South Sudan conflict and the “thousands dead in Syria, in Pakistan, in Nigeria, in Mexico, Afghanistan and Somalia; thousands more, the majority from African nations, dead in the Mediterranean Sea while attempting to flee poverty, hunger, disease or political strife or persecution.” read more

M25 road rage killer Kenneth Noye to be transferred to an open prison

first_imgHe went on the run after killing Mr Cameron and was arrested in Spain in 1998.A plan will now be drawn up for the timing of the transfer, which is expected to take place within six weeks, while officials will also weigh up which establishment Noye will be moved to.Open prisons have lower security than “closed” jails.Transfers from higher security categories to open conditions are generally part of a long-term path towards release, depending on the prisoner’s progress in a number of areas.Offenders’ suitability for returning to the community are tested by exposing them to conditions more similar to those they would encounter on the outside.Noye would be assessed again by the Parole Board before he can be released. Cameron, 21, who was stabbed to death in front of his girlfriendCredit: PA Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Stephen Lee Cameron, 21, who was stabbed to death in front of his girlfriend by Kenneth Noyecenter_img Road-rage killer Kenneth Noye is to be transferred to an open prison after the Justice Secretary rubber-stamped a recommendation from the Parole Board.Noye, now 70, was convicted of murder in April 2000 and sentenced to life with a minimum term of 16 years, after stabbing 21-year-old electrician Stephen Cameron to death in an attack on the M25 in Kent in 1996.Last month the Parole Board said it was not directing Noye’s release, but recommended that he be transferred to “open conditions”.The advice was passed to the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) for the final decision, and the department confirmed on Tuesday that Justice Secretary David Lidington had accepted the recommendation.An MoJ spokesman said: “Public protection is our top priority and transfers to open conditions are made after a thorough, expert risk assessment carried out by the independent Parole Board.” In September 2015 the Parole Board recommended Noye be moved to an open jail, but this was blocked by then justice secretary Michael Gove.Earlier this year Noye won a High Court challenge against the refusal decision, which his counsel argued was “unlawful and irrational”.One of Britain’s most notorious criminals, Noye had been jailed for handling bullion stolen in the infamous 1983 Brink’s-Mat robbery and was released two years before the M25 attack.last_img read more