Tate’s rooftop PV shines, U.K.’s solar outlook darkens

first_imgTate’s rooftop PV shines, U.K.’s solar outlook darkensIconic London gallery goes solar as it unveils its new rooftop PV system; presentations on uncertain future of U.K. solar industry held during ceremony. October 23, 2015 pv magazine Legal Markets Markets & Policy Share It was a cloudy morning in London, but Tate Modern’s star shined. London’s famous gallery of contemporary art was unveiling its new rooftop PV system, donated to the gallery by Solarcentury, the British solar firm that organized the event, which also included a line-up of presentations addressing the U.K.’s solar future. Tate’s rooftop PV system is located on the building’s turbine hall – which before being converted into an art gallery used to house a power plant . This is the second “celebrity” installation that Solarcentury has completed in London, following the PV system installed at the Blackfriars Bridge right in the heart of the city. Does a gifted solar rooftop make Tate Modern a green establishment, given that it also receives generous sponsorships from BP and other fossil fuel companies? That question was left hanging in the air from a Guardian newspaper journalist who asked specifically if there is a conflict of interests at play. Rather wisely, Tate had decided not to send a representative to the event. A bleak, or simply cloudy, day for U.K. solar?London’s sky is, unsurprisingly, cloudy today. However, Darren Johnson, chair at the London Assembly’s Environment Committee, put it more accurately. “This might be a black day for U.K. solar since the consultation on the amendment of the feed-in tariffs (FITs) ends today,” Johnson said. Johnson laid bare that London lags behind in solar rooftops compared to other parts of the country and that the city needs to develop a certain plan and strategy to boost the industry, similar to the ambitious plans laid out by New York. Johnson’s conclusions were based on a recent report published by London’s Assembly titled “How London’s homes could generate more solar energy.” Other participants also agreed that London grows faster than ever and urgently needs a green infrastructure plan. What a pity the Committee’s recommendations and findings come in a time that the U.K. government appears to have decided to phase solar power out of the country’s energy mix. Volume matters Following the government’s policy decision to remove the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs) for new PV plants, to scrap the grandfathering mechanism for most of the PV project applications lined up in the old ROC process and to utterly change the accreditation and the size of the FIT scheme, the U.K. solar industry is expecting consolidation and radical shake-up. Targeting specifically the proposed FITs, Paul Barwell, president at the U.K. Solar Trade Association, told the event that these are unworkable since they lead to zero percent investment return and consumers will never be able to borrow capital at such low interest rates to complete PV projects. Also worrying are the installation caps the government has suggested, Barwell added. To reduce the cost of solar and transition the industry safely to a zero subsidy future, U.K. solar needs both higher tariffs and caps, Barwell argued. The first will allow rooftop PV to be investable, the second will allow volume, and thus enable PV cost reduction through the supply chain. At the moment, what we hear from many small to medium installers is that they have been forced to inform their employees that should the new FITs apply in January, they might lose their jobs. Solarcentury’s CEO Frans van den Heuvel told the event under the proposed FITs the company will cancel £16 million of projects in the U.K. and will perhaps need to reduce slightly its workforce. Job cuts though will mainly come via other parts of the supply chain, e.g. in sub-contractors that Solarcentury collaborates with. Future U.K. solar business perspective Naturally, the discussion revolved around the business perspectives for U.K.’s solar sector. The future business perspectives for solar, both in the U.K. and abroad, will need to be developed around the independent power producer (IPP) model, argued Ben Warren, head of energy and environmental finance at Ernst and Young’s U.K. energy team. Businesses all over the world start to generate or purchase electricity directly on their own. This is a trend that cannot be reversed by any regulator because the technology allows it. Asked by pv magazine, Warren said net metering is also a viable solution for the U.K. The British energy regulator should allow it. And even if net-metering does not provide the remuneration sums that FITs did in the past, it will transmit long-term certainty that customers will value, Warren added. Five years ago, a 1 MW PV system cost £5 million. Today it costs £700,000, Warren reminded attendees – food for thought for all involved as the morning ticked by, and London’s dense canopy of grey cloud dispersed, just a little bit.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. 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Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved imp… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). 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By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. Any other transfer to third parties will not take place unless this is justified on the basis of applicable data protection regulations or if pv magazine is legally obliged to do so.You may revoke this consent at any time with effect for the future, in which case your personal data will be deleted immediately. Otherwise, your data will be deleted if pv magazine has processed your request or the purpose of data storage is fulfilled.Further information on data privacy can be found in our Data Protection Policy.iAbout these recommendationsKeep up to date pv magazine Global offers daily updates of the latest photovoltaics news. We also offer comprehensive global coverage of the most important solar markets worldwide. Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Insight @ Energy Storage North America 2020 11 November 2020 pv-magazine.com Developed and moderated by pv magazine, the panel sessions address a hot topic within the industry, from multiple angles. Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com New for this year, the program will be developed and moderated by Eric Wesoff the new editorial leader of the U.S. platform. 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Yet sometimes, even when best practice is a… On strong fundamentals pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The solar industry faced headwinds in March, writes Jesse Pichel of ROTH Capital Partners, thanks to rising interest rat… PV feed in, certified pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Ohio Team uses Joplin Hospital Disaster as Training

first_imgWUPW FOX Toledo, OH – Last Sunday’s deadly and devastating events in Joplin, Mo., will be examined closely by everyone in the disaster response business – especially those in the medical field. The EF-5 200 mph tornado that struck a direct hit on a hospital may provide some lessons learned, especially for a team of Toledo doctors, nurses, and an EMT who already have taken a critical look at evacuating a medical center quickly and efficiently. Their effort focused on going beyond the theoretical and provide a more practical approach when seconds and minutes matter most.last_img read more

World Series 2018: 18 questions after the Dodgers’ epic 18-inning Game 3 victory

first_imgAnd then Game 5 happened. In this one, the Dodgers forced extra innings with three runs in the ninth to tie the game, 12-12. With two outs in the bottom of the 10th, Brian McCann was hit by a pitch and George Springer walked (and McCann was replaced by pinch-runner Derek Fisher). Alex Bregman delivered the game-winning single. That contest featured seven home runs — five by the Astros — six half-innings with at least three runs scored and only three full innings without any runs scored. Crazy.So don’t Sharpie Game 3 quite yet.18. Is October baseball just the best? Yes. Yes it is. Now, let’s look forward. Here are 18 questions we have after that 18-inning journey.MORE: Austin Barnes, Julio Urias becoming key cogs for Dodgers1. OK, so let’s start here: What’s next?Both pitching staffs should actually be OK for Game 4, believe it or not, as long as it doesn’t go another 18 innings. Porcello and Eovaldi are out of the mix for the Red Sox, obviously, but none of their other hurlers threw more than 28 pitches. Closer Craig Kimbrel is likely limited to an inning (he threw the 28), but everyone else should be ready to go. Drew Pomeranz will certainly have to make his postseason debut, which will make Boston fans nervous. “We’ll map it out tomorrow,” manager Alex Cora said. “There are a few guys that are lining up in my office to start the game tomorrow. We’ll decide what we’ll do and we’ll be fine.”And the Dodgers, despite their cryptic late-night tweet about the identity of their Game 4 starter — it was slated to be Rich Hill — are just fine, too, unless Hill is completely out of the mix. He seemed just fine in the clubhouse after the game, and manager Dave Roberts even talked about him in his postgame presser: “We expect Richie to come out with some fire like he always has. Like I said, counting outs, looking at the pen, we’re in good shape.”We’ll find out in a few hours.2. How important, really, was the outcome of that game?It meant everything. It’s a completely new series, with Boston leading 2-1.“If we don’t pull this out we might just be playing for fun,” Dodgers veteran David Freese said. “Down 3-0, that’s really tough. Holy cow. Just incredible. I’m really happy for these guys.”Think about it this way: No team has EVER come back from being down 3-0 in the World Series. Ever. But three teams in the past five years have come back from a 2-1 deficit: the Cubs in 2016, the Giants in 2014 and the Red Sox in 2013.Yep. Doesn’t matter how the Dodgers got to 2-1, it only matters that they’re there now. And this is a completely new series. MORE: 13 insane facts from the longest game in postseason history3. OK, so it’s a new series. Gotcha. What does that mean?Maybe not much, honestly. Just like being down 2-0 didn’t keep the Dodgers from climbing back into the series, winning Game 3 doesn’t mean they’ll win Game 4. You’ll read a lot about the Dodgers having “momentum” and things of that nature, and maybe they do have a pitching advantage in Game 4 if Drew Pomeranz is asked to throw multiple innings for the first time this month. But the Dodgers have actually been in a similar situation in the World Series. On the other side. Remember the 1988 Fall Classic? Of course you do. The mighty Oakland A’s were heavily favored in that one, but the scrappy Dodgers won Games 1 and 2 (thanks to a Kirk Gibson home run you might remember).Game 3 was tied, 1-1, entering the bottom of the ninth. With one out, Mark McGwire hit a walk-off home run off Jay Howell, giving the A’s their first W of the series. Finally, lots of folks figured, order had been restored. Win a game in that dramatic fashion and momentum will surely carry on into the next couple of contests, right?Nope. The Dodgers won Games 4 and 5 in Oakland and claimed the World Series. 4. Has Nathan Eovaldi thrown his last World Series pitch?The Red Sox sure hope so. After his Herculean 97-pitch effort in Game 3 — and relief appearances in Games 1 and 2, too — he won’t be available to pitch again in Los Angeles. Boston would love to win Games 4 and 5 at Dodger Stadium to wrap up the series and make Eovaldi’s next task hoisting the World Series trophy. If the series does shift back to the East Coast, the right-hander would be on three days rest for Game 6 and four for Game 7.MORE: Nathan Eovaldi has a game for the ages, even as losing pitcher5. Can we finally drop pitcher wins/losses as a statistic?Seriously. Eovaldi was saddled with the loss. Alex Wood, who pitched the 18th for the Dodgers, was given the win because he was the pitcher of record when Muncy hit his home run. That’s, well, stupid.6. Will Dave Roberts finally let his best players play?Max Muncy, who led the Dodgers with 35 home runs, hit the Game 3-winning home run (and drew the walk in the 13th that led to the game-tying run). Joc Peterson, who tied for second on the team with 25 home runs and hit three in the 2017 World Series, hit the solo home run that gave the Dodgers a 1-0 lead in the third inning.Neither of those guys started Games 1 or 2 in Boston, because they’re left-handed hitters and the Red Sox went with lefty starting pitchers. Peterson, at least, has traditionally struggled against lefties, so maybe his benching made sense. But Muncy? He had an .891 OPS against southpaws this season, and yet he still couldn’t crack the starting lineup.At some point, your best players have to play. Muncy definitely should start every game going forward, and Peterson should be in the Game 4 lineup, regardless whether Boston starts lefty Drew Pomeranz or lefty Eduardo Rodriguez. MORE: 10 of the most unlikely heroes in World Series history7. Where have we seen this Buehler/Muncy combo before?Well, not many of us saw this (I didn’t), but that pitching/hitting combo did team up for a win earlier this year, too. In Triple-A.Walker Buehler’s 2018 season began with a start on April 5 in an Oklahoma City at Iowa Triple-A game.The Dodgers’ farm team won 2-1. The deciding run? A 5th-inning Max Muncy solo HR.— Sarah Langs (@SlangsOnSports) October 27, 20188. Seriously, how amazing is this Max Muncy story?It’s pretty damn incredible. Let go by the A’s after failing in extended big-league tryouts, back to the minors for the 2017 season and then 35 homers and a walk-off shot in the 18th inning of a World Series game? “This whole year has been a surreal experience that it’s hard to put into words. But just getting a chance to play in the World Series has kind of capped it off,” Muncy said. “And then getting a chance to hit a walk-off home run, obviously there’s not many words I can use to describe that. The feeling was just pure joy and incredible excitement. That’s about all I can think of because it’s hard to describe how good a feeling it is.”MORE: Dodgers’ Max Muncy revels in ‘pure joy’ of walk-off homer9. Can we talk about Eovaldi again?Yes. Yes we can. Even the Dodgers knew something special was happening. “Just an insane outing by him,” David Freese said. “You start thinking about Bumgarner. I know I did toward the back half of his outing. Just crazy. There are very few guys who can pull that off.”Madison Bumgarner, of course, basically willed the Giants to the 2014 World Series all by himself. After his complete-game shutout in Game 5, the lefty came on in relief in Game 7 and threw five more shutout innings in a game San Francisco won, 3-2. Aside from one pitch to Muncy, Eovaldi was every bit as good.“Once Eovaldi came in there, if kinda felt just like another game with another starter going,” Kershaw said. “He did an amazing job.”His final line: 6+ innings, 3 hits, 1 earned run, 1 walk, 5 strikeouts.“He’s putting everything together. The pitch mix, good breaking balls, good cutters, good fastballs, you almost have to be perfect in that situation,” Cora said. “And actually he was perfect. We just didn’t make one play and they put a good swing on it. But effort-wise, I don’t know, World Series, that was one of the best performances probably in the history of the World Series.”MORE: Ian Kinsler explains critical error that cost Red Sox Game 310. Is Walker Buehler now L.A.’s best pitcher?Probably, yeah. And that’s not just about the seven shutout innings he turned in, though those were impressive. It’s about HOW he turned in those seven shutout innings.Buehler, the 24-year-old rookie, was painting the corners with his 99-mph fastball. He was dropping nasty breaking pitches all over the edges of the zone. He had Boston hitters — remember, the Red Sox led the majors in runs scored — looking like Pawtucket hitters. “You can’t say enough about Walker. Just a flat-out stud,” Freese said. “He’s had the ball in some very meaningful games this October, and we’re very happy about that.”Some players embrace the stage more than others.  “I think that certain people can handle a moment like this and understand what was at stake tonight. And we needed his best effort,” Roberts said. “And we needed him to go deeper than their starter, log some innings. And some guys run from it. Some guys can’t answer the bell. But this guy, he’s got an overt confidence, a quiet confidence, a little combo. But he’s got tremendous stuff. And he lives for moments like this. So it’s good to have obviously him on our side. And the age is really something we don’t concern ourselves about. It’s kind of what’s in between the head and the heart. He’s got what it takes to be that top-of-the-rotation guy.”He is that top-of-the-rotation guy. Right now. 11. Is Eduardo Nunez alive?Nunez didn’t start Game 3, but he was beaten up by the end of it. Three times last night he wound up sprawled out on the field and needed a moment to compose himself.I asked him after the game how he felt. “Sore. Sore,” he said with a grin. “But we’re fine. Don’t have a choice. We have two more games to go, and then we have three more months to recover.”He entered the game in the 10th. “After the dirt ball, when the catcher ran over him, he felt he was in bad shape,” Cora said. “But like I told him, he’s like, ‘I’m not coming out.’ I said, ‘Well, you can’t come out. We have no more players.’”12. Is Jackie Bradley Jr. the best two-out hitter ever?Only seems like that. The defensive whiz tied the game with two outs in the eighth inning, with his long home run off L.A. closer Kenley Jansen. It was his 10th two-out RBI of the postseason, with at least two games remaining. Sandy Alomar Jr. holds the record, with 14 in the 1997 postseason.13. What numbers from Game 3 will stand out, historically?Take your pick, really. The game lasted 7 hours and 20 minutes, almost a full hour longer than any other postseason game. It went 18 innings, four innings longer than any other World Series game.But here’s the one that stands out to me: The teams combined to throw 561 pitches in Game 3 (283 for Boston, 278 for L.A.), smashing the previous World Series record. The old record was 482, set by the White Sox and Astros in Game 3 of the 2005 World Series, a 14-inning contest won by Chicago.14. Does Ian Kinsler have a second career as a pinch-runner ahead of him?Uh, no. The 36-year-old’s trip around the bases was, well, embarrassing. Immediately after he entered the game as a pinch runner for J.D. Martinez in the 10th, he was almost picked off at first base before a pitch was even thrown. Then, he slid past third base and was almost tagged out. And then, he was thrown out at the plate trying to score on a would-be sacrifice fly.That last part wasn’t his fault, though. The ball wasn’t hit very deep and Cody Bellinger made a strong throw from center field and Kinsler didn’t have much of a chance. But maybe the Red Sox save Brock Holt for pinch-running duties going forward. 15. Speaking of Kinsler, if things go south for Boston is he the new Buckner?It’s possible. Boston fans can hold onto grievances, y’know? And Kinsler had a nightmarish game. We mentioned the base running, but that’s not the worst part. With two outs in the 13th inning, Kinsler fielded a ball hit sharply by Yasiel Puig. If he makes the throw to first base for the last hour, the Red Sox win and go up, 3-0, in the series. But Kinsler stumbled and rushed the throw, missing first base by 20-something feet. That awful throw allowed Muncy to score all the way from second base, tying the game and sending us to the 14th inning. “I lost my footing a little bit,” Kinsler said, via Yahoo Sports. “I was trying to keep the ball in with a guy on second base, try not to let that ball go up the middle. I overran it a little bit, and then when I planted to turn to throw, the turf kind of gave way in the act of throwing and I just sailed it wide. I just had the last out in my glove and couldn’t get it over there. It was tough to swallow.”ARE. YOU. SERIOUS.Puig puts the ball in play, Kinsler misses the throw to 1st and Max Muncy scores to tie the game in the bottom of the 13th!!! pic.twitter.com/nS49fvMo0I— FOX Sports (@FOXSports) October 27, 201816. Did Mookie Betts or Xander Bogaerts get any sleep?Doubtful, unless they were somehow able to block out the memory of combining to go 0-for-15 as the Nos. 1 and 2 hitters in the Boston lineup. 17. Will this be the signature game of the 2018 World Series?Well, that’s impossible to know. Last year, we all figured — myself included — that there was no way we’d see anything more crazy than Houston’s win in Game 2. As you’ll recall, the Astros scored single runs in the eighth and ninth to send the game to extra innings, and then scored twice in the 10th to seemingly put the game away. Nah. The Dodgers scored two of their own to force an 11th inning. The Astros responded with two more in the 11th, and just barely held on for the win despite a Charlie Culberson solo home run with two outs that trimmed Houston’s lead to a single run.  LOS ANGELES — Hopefully you’ve had a chance to digest what happened during the Dodgers’ win in a marathon Game 3 on Friday night (and Saturday’s wee hours).And hopefully you’ve had a chance to read some of the great stories describing an unforgettable contest in World Series history.last_img read more

Episode 10: Walt Disney World Preplanning

first_imgShare This!Did you know that TouringPlans has a podcast? No really, we do! TEN episodes in fact!Okay, so maaaaybe Brian and I have dropped the ball a little (a lot) when it comes to promoting these episodes. It’s okay though. We’re turning over a new leaf! From now on, every new episode will be found right here on the blog.TouringPlans blogger and former Disney Parks Moms Panelist, Erin Foster, joined us this week. In this episode, we discussed preplanning a trip to Walt Disney World. How far in advance do you really need to start planning your trip? When should you make an itinerary? Listen in as we tackle those questions.Listen on iTunes Listen via RSS feedBe sure to subscribe to our podcast and give us a rating if you don’t mind. See you next time!last_img read more

Silicon Welly

first_imgrichard macmanus Related Posts A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… This post mayring a bell for all the non-Silicon Valley readers. Firstly an admission: I hardly everwrite about my home country, New Zealand. The reason for that is mostly down todemographics: just 1% of Read/WriteWeb’s page views come from my own country. The US, UKand Canada are where the bulk of R/WW’s readers come from – but I’m also pleased with thegrowth in readers from Europe, Asia and other parts of the world.So 1% would indicate that NZers are just a tiny slice of the R/WW target audience –and that’s true. But recently I’ve noticed an increase in web 2.0 excitement in NewZealand. And I think people from other countries may have a similar feeling – thatthis current era of the Web is creating opportunities and innovation far outside SiliconValley (even though the Valley still is the spiritual and monetary home of theWeb).The NZ 2.0 mailing list wasstarted by Nat Torkington (of O’Reilly Media)and yours truly in November last year. Lately on the list there’s been discussion about“Silicon Welly” – a new nickname for my hometown of Wellington, coined by NatalieFerguson and Tim Norton of local startup Decisive Flow.Wellington is beginning to see a lot of activity in web app development, accompanied (itmust be said) by a sudden increase in Wellingtonians wanting to show me their businessplans or prototypes ;-). Plus there are more events – the Webstock conference earlierthis year and a recent fun geek event run by my friends at geekzone.co.nz. Christchurch too has a lot ofactivity and is where the development arm of Eurekster (the social search engine) is based. Notforgetting my pals in Auckland, such as the team behind Throng – a site for TV fansfrom New Zealand.Idealog, a magazine in NZ, recentlyran a piece about the Silicon Welly phenomenon:“So where are the bright young things creating kick-ass web businesses in Godzone?The good news is they’re out there. Take, for example, ProjectX, a team ofsuperbright online mapping gurus who have licensed their technology to Trade Me for itsSmaps website and have their sights set on providing mapping tools for the world.Consider also Star Now, an inspired site built by three Wellingtonians on their OE whichintroduces dancers, actors, models, musicians and reality TV wannabes to castingdirectors, movie and TV producers and to each other.”So the Web is (finally) making an impact in NZ, a country of 4 million peopleon the other side of the world. If you’re an international R/WW reader, I wonder if youhave a similar story to tell about your local Web market? Is the Web ramping up in yourcountry too?Picture of kiwi bird: jdlasica Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#international#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Rock Bridge wins first boys basketball state title

first_imgFor the first time ever, the Rock Bridge boys are state champs in basketball.The Bruins beat CBC 63-59 in the Class 5 final on Saturday at JQH Arena in Springfield.Rock Bridge (25-3) was down by eight entering the fourth, but scored 26 points in the final quarter for the comeback win.Isiaih Mosley led the Bruins with 24 points. On Sunday, he announced on social media he will continue playing basketball on that floor, committing to Missouri State.The Jefferson City girls just missed their first state crown, losing in the Class 5 championship game to North Kansas City 43-34 on Saturday. The Lady Jays wound up 29-2 on the season.last_img read more

Fintro Hockey World League: Indian women almost at Olympics doorstep

first_imgIndian girls weathered a Japanese onslaught in the last quarter and a half before hanging on to the 13th-minute goal by Rani Rampal to grab fifth place at the Fintro Hockey World League match on Saturday. In the coming weeks, the win should officially translate into an entry into next year’s Rio Olympics.Japan (No. 10) was ranked three places above India, who had beaten them for the bronze medal at the 2014 Incheon Asian Games. While only the top-3 from the two HWL Semi-Final and five continental champions make the Olympics, places will fall vacant as some of the qualified teams are also likely to win Continental championships. Korea has won the Asian Games; and either Australia or New Zealand (third and fourth here) should win Oceania while Argentina and the United States (fourth and fifth at the Valencia HWL) will be favourites at the Panam Games. Netherlands, who will qualify from Antwerp, Great Britain and Germany, who also qualified from Valencia, will be favourites for the European championships.Saturday’s match could broadly be divided into two halves, the first dominated by India and the second by Japan.India began sharply and won an early penalty corner, which was wasted. But coach Mathias Ahrens’s team took the lead in the 13th minute after Lilima Minz took the ball from inside the Indian half and passed to Vandana Katariya, who ended her fine run with a reverse shot.The attempt was saved by Japanese goalkeeper Sakiyo Asano, but an unmarked Rani Rampal put the ‘near half-volley’ over the custodian’s reach.advertisementFive minutes into the second half, a loose clearance at the 25-yard line put Japan in possession and a long ball into the circle came to Akane Shibata, whose two shots were saved by goalkeeper Savita. But off the second save, the ball bounced and led to a penalty corner, which was wasted.Indians did go on a couple of attacks but no clear shot was taken.The third quarter was dominated by Japan, who launched dangerous attacks and got penalty corners but just couldn’t get the ball into the goal.A 38th-minute penalty corner was saved on the goalmouth by Monika, and Savita took a shot on the body. All the action was within the Indian 25-yard line, but Savita and the defenders held out.In the final quarter, Monika suffered cramps and was replaced by Deep Grace Ekka. Vandana Katariya was also injured and had to leave with three minutes left.Japan kept up the pressure as a defensive India allowed them to dominate. In the last seven minutes, the Japanese girls virtually camped in the Indian circle, but could not find the equaliser despite five penalty corners.last_img read more

AUSSIE TEAMS ARRIVE IN SOUTH AFRICA FOR WORLD CUP

first_imgAustralia’s World Cup Teams arrived in Stellenbosch South Africa ahead of the sixth World Cup of Touch to be played in the South African province from 17 – 21 January 2007.The three Open Teams arrived in Stellenbosch after a travel itinerary that included an overnight stay in Perth followed by an 11-hour flight to Johannesburg with a bumpy entry in driving rain and lightning.A 2-hour flight to Cape Town was followed up by a 45-minute bus drive to the protea hotel in Stellenbosch where all seven teams will take up residence for the next 11 days.Some very weary travelers arrived at 10.30pm local time to collapse into their beds and begin the process of acclimatizing to their new surrounds.After a sumptuous breakfast, set against a beautiful backdrop of the famed Stellenbosch Mountains and wine district, the three teams set off for their first training run on South African soil to blow out the travel cobwebs and begin the last phases of physical work required to top off their pre-tournament preparations. After training, all three teams attended a traditional South African theme park ‘Boya’ at nearby Spier organized by former South African native, and Australian Team Medico Doctor Martin Jaffe.As well as the traditional South African food and entertainment on offer, the Aussie Teams engaged in tours of the Cheetah Park at Spier and local arts and craft displays.The highlights for the Aussie teams included Australian Open Mixed Captain Tony Eltakchi and Men’s Open player Anthony Ziade borrowing some traditional South African garb and entertaining all and sundry with an impromptu dancing display with a few of the locals.When ‘Tash’ incited the locals to chant, “The roof is on fire” some looked skyward to the ceiling, a little panicked, and then relieved to discover that the roof was, in fact, NOT on fire after all.Elsewhere Jason Stanton and Kylie ‘Warnie’ Hilder, were enlisting Stellenbosch locals to help construct human pyramids, and Rebecca Tavo jammed on the Bongos with African native performers.Mixed speedster Brad ‘BJ’ Holden was sizing himself up against Adult Cheetah “Hemmingway” in the Cheetah enclosures for a “fast and the furious” sprint off – but Hemmingway may have the little guy’s measure with a 0 – 80 km hour acceleration in just three seconds.The baby cheetah cubs proved irresistible to most of the girls, and a high percentage of the boys, who fell in love with the gorgeous endangered babies.All three Open teams also visited the famed Table Mountain over the last two days and enjoyed the view from one of the World’s truly great Mountain peaks.A comprehensive tour of Table Mountain provided many memorable photo opportunities for the group, though Australian Women’s Open player Peta Rogerson was not impressed with her little sister Hayley, who on every occasion possible sent Peta’s heart racing with her photo poses as close to the edge of the mountain as possible.  “Hayley, stick to the trail!” was uttered in vain many times by the concerned elder sibling who admits to bouts of giddiness on an escalator. Tony Eltakchi again borrowed an outfit from a worker and a walkie-talkie to entertain the crowd.Kristy Judd, Steve Roberts, and Kelly Woods provided some insightful questions and comments to keep our knowledgeable guide Rainer on her toes and were very good at yelling “View!” to alert onlookers of a clearing of the mist to glimpse better views of the beautiful Capetown coastline. Light Team trainings will continue Tuesday with pockets of sight seeing for some as teams look to rest and focus with first games commencing on Wednesday.The Australian Senior Teams arrived after a wicked travel schedule that saw plane delays ensure connecting flights were not able to be met, forcing some teams into long stays in airports and some players to stay overnight in Johannesburg before flying to Cape town then bussing onto Stellenbosch this morning.After an exhaustive and somewhat trying battle to reach their destination, all Australian representatives finally arrived safe and sound in Stellenbosch this morning. Most senior teams trained lightly today and relaxed in the afternoon, with many team members acclimatizing and fending off the effects of jet lag after their odyssey to get to the World Cup.In brighter news, all World Cup Teams and Touch Football Australia would like to pass on their congratulations to popular Australian Women’s Open player Dominique Maher on her marriage to Ryan Barlow, Dom married her beau before close family and friends at Cronulla on Saturday before postponing her honeymoon to board a plane for Johannesburg to take up her position in the Australian Women’s Team for the World Cup.Dominique is the third of the famed Maher clan to wear the green and gold at World Cup level, following in the footsteps of her elder sisters ATA Hall of Fame member and former Australian Women’s Captain Katrina, and former Australian Women’s Open Vice Captain Gabrielle. Teams will put the finishing touches to preparations tomorrow with training sessions, tactical sessions, and relaxation periods for the players to prepare their minds and bodies for the World Cup competition that begins in earnest on Wednesday with all seven Australian teams in action on day one.last_img read more

QLD – Level 1 Coaching Course, Townsville

first_imgContact: Angee Lane, North Queensland Touch AssociationPhone: (07) 4728 6133Email: [email protected]: http://www.northqldtouch.com.aulast_img