June 2021

Why Martin Shkreli reminds us so darn much of Donald Trump

first_imgTrump has called Shkreli “a spoiled brat.” And in an interview with STAT last year, Shkreli contrasted his own humble upbringing in a working-class immigrant family with Trump’s inherited wealth — and noted that, in his estimation, selling pharmaceuticals is “a much greater cause” than dealing in real estate. “I don’t like Trump,” Shkreli said.OK. But the parallels are undeniable.Both wield social media as a weaponShkreli did something remarkable on Thursday: He used Twitter to insert his voice, in real time, into a congressional hearing just minutes after he was excused because he refused to answer questions.After invoking his constitutional right to silence, Shkreli left the room and started tweeting. Lawmakers noticed his tweet calling them “imbeciles” — and started talking about it during the hearing. Representative Elijah Cummings, who minutes earlier had upbraided Shkreli for smirking through the questioning, wanted to know if Nancy Retzlaff, another Turing executive still at the hearing, knew about it. (She said she didn’t.)It was classic Shkreli. And also, really, classic Trump.Both tirelessly retweet their supporters. Both use Twitter to smack down critics and insult rivals. And both can’t resist using the forum to bash journalists. Just two recent examples:The dying @NRO National Review has totally given up the fight against Barrack Obama. They have been losing for years. I will beat Hillary!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 22, 2016 Most corporate executives hauled in to testify before Congress treat it with a certain gravitas. (Retzlaff and Howard Schiller, the interim chief executive of Valeant Pharmaceuticals, were also on the hot seat at Thursday’s hearing, but they kept a sober demeanor as they politely answered questions.) Even when subpoenaed executives plead the Fifth, they tend to sit solemnly.Shkreli? He saw the hearing as a theatrical, ultimately meaningless, attempt by lawmakers to make him a scapegoat for the drug industry’s widespread price hikes — and acted accordingly. His smirks and grins were so unusual for the venue that veteran Politico reporter John Bresnahan tweeted this: WASHINGTON — Martin Shkreli’s total disregard for decorum was on display Thursday when he was called to testify before a House committee. The disgraced pharma executive pleaded the Fifth when grilled about his decision to hike the price of a decades-old drug by more than 5,000 percent.He smirked. He smiled. And almost as soon as he walked out of the hearing room, he tweeted that the elected representatives who had interrogated him were “imbeciles.”Hard to accept that these imbeciles represent the people in our government.— Martin Shkreli (@MartinShkreli) February 4, 2016 Bear with us. We’re onto something here. Even for a politician, Trump has a unique ability to irritate the public. In November, when Gallup rounded up the favorability ratings of all the 2016 candidates, Trump scored by far the worst. By far.The pharma industry is nearly as unpopular as politicians. A STAT-Harvard poll found that barely 50 percent of Americans believe drug companies are doing a good job serving their customers.Yet it’s Shkreli who keeps getting singled out. He was the star (or target) of Thursday’s hearing. Ask voters in Iowa about drug prices, and his story is the one they bring up on their own — just as they’re more likely to mention Trump unprompted than any other candidate.Both have set the media to second-guessingHere’s one last parallel:A lot of people believe Shkreli has gotten way too much ink.Many think the same about Trump.If you’ve read this far, you might disagree. But on that note, we’re out. Related: Related: Both gleefully overturn social normsCongressional hearings and presidential debates are important and must be taken seriously. That’s the conventional wisdom.Shkreli and Trump won’t have any of it. Unrepentant and brash, Martin Shkreli defends Daraprim pricing ‘It’s not funny, Mr. Shkreli. People are dying.’ Not surprised. Bloomberg @business has some very good journalists, and several very, very poor ones. https://t.co/L6xuGPI8rh— Martin Shkreli (@MartinShkreli) February 4, 2016center_img Trump would have appreciated the show.After all, he’s the candidate who skipped last week’s debate in Des Moines to make a point in his feud with Fox News.Both drive people nutsThe Shkreli-Trump comparison isn’t a new one — back in October, Salon dubbed Shkreli “the Donald Trump of drug development.”The Verge observed that Shkreli “has managed to offend almost as many people as Donald Trump without having the platform of a nationwide presidential campaign to help him.”And therein lies another parallel: Much of their notoriety — and perhaps genius? — can be found in their preternatural ability to drive everybody else crazy. Donald Trump and Martin Skhreli both have a knack for driving people crazy. Getty Images (2) ‘Pow!’ ‘It will be huge.’ Emails show Shkreli’s team exulting at drug price hike First, let’s stipulate that Trump and Shkreli don’t like each other.advertisement By Rebecca Robbins and Dylan Scott Feb. 4, 2016 Reprints PoliticsWhy Martin Shkreli reminds us so darn much of Donald Trump Related: It sounded, quite frankly, a whole lot like another celebrity-turned-political-symbol with a flair for impropriety: Donald J. Trump.advertisement Tags Donald Trumpdrug pricesMartin Shkrelipolicylast_img read more

Novartis and the feds squabble over 80,000 ‘sham’ speaking events

first_img [email protected] Novartis and the US Department of Justice are squabbling over documents that allegedly contain details of nearly 80,000 “sham” events that the drug maker used to encourage doctors to prescribe several blood pressure medicines, according to documents filed late last week in federal court in New York.The tussle comes as part of a run-up to a planned trial this summer in which the feds plan to argue that Novartis violated federal antikickback laws for nearly a decade. Last November, the feds sought the documents, but the drug maker has maintained the government is unfairly expanding the scope of its inquiry and that the request is “extraordinarily burdensome,” according to court documents. The drug maker wants a protective order.The trial is an outgrowth of a whistleblower lawsuit filed five years ago by Oswald Bilotta, a former Novartis sales rep, and was joined by the Justice Department in 2013. The feds, in fact, joined two separate lawsuits at the time that alleged Novartis paid bribes to boost prescriptions of its medicines, and, as a result, caused federal health care programs to overpay for medicines.advertisement The cases gained considerable attention because US Attorney Preet Bharara, who is based in New York, claimed Novartis is a repeat offender when he announced the government had joined the lawsuits.Here’s the back story: In an earlier case resolved in 2010, the company paid $422.5 million in penalties and pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor for improperly promoting several drugs. Novartis also signed a five-year corporate integrity agreement, which required establishing an internal compliance program and reporting violations. For these reasons, Bharara’s choice of words suggested the drug maker may face a much stiffer punishment in the two more recent cases.advertisement Related: By Ed Silverman March 28, 2016 Reprints PharmalotNovartis and the feds squabble over 80,000 ‘sham’ speaking events Ed Silverman @Pharmalot center_img Tags bribesDOJNovartis About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Novartis agrees to $25m settlement over bribery charges in China Last fall, Novartis agreed to settle one of those two cases that the feds joined in 2013. In that other case, the feds alleged the company induced specialty pharmacies to boost prescriptions. The drug maker paid a $390 million settlement, which was much less than the $3.35 billion in damages and civil fines the Justice Department sought initially. The agreement also placed greater responsibility on Novartis executives to avoid similar infractions, although the company was not barred from dealing with federal health care programs.As a result, Novartis may settle the Bilotta case, according to Patrick Burns, who heads Taxpayers Against Fraud, a nonprofit that advocates for tough penalties and is partially funded by attorneys. “It’s hard to know, but the facts here are pretty simple,” said Burns. “The conduct is pretty outrageous and discovery is going to be brutal. Novartis’s legal team is incentivized to fight, but it’s hard to see how that squares with shareholder’s interest.”As for Novartis, a spokesman sent us this note: Novartis “disagrees with the way the government has characterized its conduct in these matters and continues to dispute the government’s allegations. Novartis is committed to ensuring that physicians and patients have the information they need to make informed health care decisions and believes speaker programs can help educate other health care providers about the appropriate use of medicines, so they can make informed prescribing decisions, which in turn enhances patient care.”In any event, the feds appear intent on pressuring the drug maker.In a document filed last week, the feds wrote that “this case implicates issues of enormous public concern: whether Novartis defrauded federal health care programs of hundreds of millions of dollars by systematically providing inducements to doctors across the country, for a decade, in an effort to influence the drugs they prescribed to patients in their care.”The Bilotta case, by the way, is chock-full of details that underscore why the feds are concerned with speaker programs. According to court documents, from 2002 to 2011, Novartis made payments and sponsored “lavish” dinners for doctors to discuss several high blood pressure drugs, but that these events were purportedly kickbacks to the speakers and attendees to induce them to prescribe the medicines.Moreover, the feds argued some programs had “little to no educational value.” Why? Either the events never actually occurred, or doctors never spoke about the drug at issue. Just the same, the feds alleged payments were made in the form of honoraria as if speaking sessions did take place. Some presentations were made on fishing trips off the Florida coast or at a Hooters restaurant.The drugmaker often treated doctors to expensive dinners at high-end restaurants, according to the documents. In one instance, a dinner for three, including the speaker, at a Washington, D.C., restaurant cost $2,016, or $672 per person. At another event held on Valentine’s Day in 2006, Novartis paid $3,127 for a meal for two at a West Des Moines, Iowa restaurant.During the 10-year span, Novartis spent more than $65 million and ran more than 38,000 speaker programs for three of its blood pressure drugs. Speakers were paid an average of between $750 and $1,500, although some received $3,000 per program, according to the court documents. The feds also allege that Novartis had few checks on whether sales reps accurately reported attendance. The DOJ alleges Novartis violated federal antikickback laws for almost a decade. Jon Elswick/APlast_img read more

Ebola virus persists in semen far longer than thought, study finds

first_img How Ebola killsVolume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2016/08/30/ebola-semen-persistence/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0003:0403:04  The Ebola virus only has 7 genes and is smaller than a blood cell, but during an infection the deadly disease can shut down multiple organs. Here’s how it works. Hyacinth Empinado/STAT After it became apparent some people in the West African Ebola outbreak were being infected through sex, the WHO advised that male survivors be tested so they would know their status. It advises abstinence or the use of condoms until a man has twice tested negative for the virus.The researchers reported on results from 429 participants in the program, 38 of whom tested positive at least once for traces of Ebola in their semen.That ratio — 9 percent — is a bit deceptive. Dr. Mary Choi, one of the lead authors of the article, said the program was only established in July of 2015, six or seven months after the peak of Liberia’s outbreak.Had the testing begun earlier, Choi said, it would have undoubtedly found more men who were positive. Given how late the work started, finding any was a bit of a surprise, she admitted.“We just figured we’d be open for a couple of months, and then we would test everybody and everyone would test negative and then we would close,” said Choi, a medical epidemiologist in CDC’s viral special pathogens branch. By Helen Branswell Aug. 30, 2016 Reprints About the Author Reprints Tags Ebolainfectious diseasesexually transmitted disease The work, published Tuesday in the journal Lancet Global Health, was done by scientists from the Liberian Ministry of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization.The findings come from Liberia’s Men’s Health Screening Program, set up to test male survivors of Ebola to see if they are still emitting virus in their semen and could potentially infect a sexual partner.advertisement HealthEbola virus persists in semen far longer than thought, study finds Related: NIAID NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development.center_img Please enter a valid email address. History credits this man with discovering Ebola on his own. History is wrong @HelenBranswell “We really didn’t think we would be getting that many people testing positive at that point in the outbreak. But we did. And because of that, we’re still operating today.”As part of the program, participants worked with trained counselors who advised them on what to do if their results were positive. Choi attributed the program’s success in getting men to come back for repeated testing — especially given the stigma attached to having had Ebola — to the work the counselors did.Survivors over age 40 were more likely than younger men to have positive semen tests, the researchers reported.Dr. Daniel Bausch, an Ebola expert working at the WHO, wrote in a commentary that this is the first time age has been identified as a risk factor for long-term Ebola shedding. It might provide a clue, he suggested, as to why this phenomenon happens, suggesting it may be due to age-related changes in the immune system.Bausch — and the authors themselves — cautioned that just because they found fragments of virus in the semen of these survivors doesn’t mean the men were capable of infecting a sex partner.The test used in the study detects traces of virus, but cannot indicate if they are part of live viruses — which would be infectious — or are residues of infection that are of no consequence.One would need to try to grow virus from the semen samples to answer that question. But given how dangerous the Ebola virus is, that work would need to be done in a laboratory with the highest level of biosafety and biosecurity precautions. West Africa doesn’t have such a lab.Bausch noted a team from the CDC did a similar study, checking the semen of American Ebola survivors. While they found viral fragments out to nine months in one case, they did not manage to grow virus from semen samples after 70 days post-infection. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Still, until more is known, Bausch said, caution is needed.“A documented case of sexual transmission in Liberia six months after acute Ebola virus disease, along with accumulating evidence of similar events, remind us that even low levels of virus can result in transmission,” he wrote.Choi said more research is needed to try to figure out why this happens.“What we’ve learned from this is that how long this virus stays in each man really does vary,” she said. “And we don’t really understand why that is.” Privacy Policy Helen Branswell The Ebola virus can hide itself in the testicles of men who’ve survived the disease for far longer than had been previously thought, a new study suggests.In fact, the research reports on a man who was still emitting fragments of Ebola viruses in his semen 565 days after he became ill — or 18 months.Previous studies had suggested the longest men emitted Ebola virus fragments was nine months.advertisementlast_img read more

Startup Spotlight: Extracting RNA to diagnose diseases on the cheap

first_img What is it? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED About the Author Reprints What’s included? Biotech [email protected] By Meghana Keshavan Dec. 8, 2016 Reprints Log In | Learn More Biotech Correspondent Meghana covers biotech and contributes to The Readout newsletter.center_img Meghana Keshavan GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags biotechnologyinfectious diseasemedical technologySTAT+Zika Virus @megkesh Modern bioscience has little reach in the more remote corners of our globe. A Detroit startup called Life Magnetics is looking to change that — by applying its next-gen RNA extraction method to build a new wave of inexpensive, point-of-care diagnostics for viral diseases like HIV, hepatitis C and Zika.The company has what amounts to a fancy tool to suck RNA out of cells. It’s a technique that’s already used in microfluidics, and in lab-on-a-chip technologies. But Life Magnetics is giving RNA extraction a bit of a makeover. I talked with CEO Kevin Hagedorn about the company, which is funded mostly through small grants from the National Science Foundation. Startup Spotlight: Extracting RNA to diagnose diseases on the cheap The new diagnostic tool would be used to identify viral diseases such as hepatitis C. APStocklast_img read more

What the J&J CEO told employees about the Trump manufacturing council

first_img GET STARTED What’s included? What is it? Johnson and Johnson CEO Alex Gorsky at a White House meeting in February. Evan Vucci/AP Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Log In | Learn More What the J&J CEO told employees about the Trump manufacturing council Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) chief executive officer Alex Gorsky was initially chastised last week for deciding to stay on President Trump’s manufacturing advisory council, before reversing course just as Trump announced the panel would be dissolved after a series of defections.A trio of internal memos sent to J&J employees, reviewed by STAT, offer some insight into Gorsky’s reasoning. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Pharmalot center_img By Ed Silverman Aug. 21, 2017 Reprints [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Ed Silverman Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Tags Donald TrumppharmaceuticalspolicypoliticsSTAT+ @Pharmalot About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

Christie: Trump committed to opioid emergency declaration

first_img Tags policy Log In | Learn More Associated Press STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? By Associated Press Sept. 19, 2017 Reprints What’s included? Politics Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. GET STARTED Christie: Trump committed to opioid emergency declaration TRENTON, N.J. — Gov. Chris Christie outlined in an interim opioid commission report to President Donald Trump that the “first and most urgent” recommendation was to declare a national emergency, but the effort has been delayed by legal and administrative questions.Christie, a Republican who chairs Trump’s anti-opioid panel, downplayed the White House’s delay in implementing the commission’s signature recommendation on Monday during a Trenton news conference on the issue and after a roundtable discussion on the crisis with pharmaceutical executives. Andrew Burton/Getty Images About the Author Reprints Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDlast_img read more

Genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter helped crack the Golden State Killer case. And yes, that last name is familiar

first_imgBiotech Genealogist Barbara Rae-Venter helped crack the Golden State Killer case. And yes, that last name is familiar STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included? Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Joseph James DeAngelo, the man investigators have accused of being the infamous Golden State Killer. ELIJAH NOUVELAGE/AFP/Getty Images Tags genetics What is it? By Rebecca Robbins Aug. 28, 2018 Reprints SAN FRANCISCO — Barbara Rae-Venter is pioneering a new, high-stakes application of genomics — one that could put killers behind bars. Half a lifetime ago, she was married to the man who went on to become perhaps the best-known pioneer of the field.The retired patent attorney and genetic genealogist offered California investigators crucial guidance that helped crack the Golden State Killer case, according to the San Jose Mercury News. GET STARTED Log In | Learn More last_img read more

Pharmalittle: Novartis exec sold stock before FDA announced data scandal; FDA OKs fewer new generics this year

first_img Good morning, everyone, and welcome to another working week. We hope the weekend respite — or holiday break, for some — was invigorating and refreshing, because the oh-so-familiar routine of meetings, deadlines, conference calls, and the like has, of course, returned. But what can you do? The world keeps spinning, no matter what. So on that note, please join us for a needed cup or three of stimulation — we fancy butter pecan today, if suggestions are needed — and enjoy the menu of tidbits assembled for you. Hope you have a smashing day and, as always, please do keep in touch …An unnamed Novartis (NVS) executive sold $946,000 worth of shares less than three weeks before the Food and Drug Administration announced data from tests of its Zolgensma gene therapy were manipulated, Reuters writes. The stock sale by an executive member of the board or executive committee was disclosed in a July 19 Swiss stock exchange filing. Novartis says “the transaction was thoroughly checked beforehand and then approved accordingly. The person in question was not in possession of relevant material information.” GET STARTED Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Pharmalot @Pharmalot By Ed Silverman Aug. 19, 2019 Reprints [email protected] Pharmalittle: Novartis exec sold stock before FDA announced data scandal; FDA OKs fewer new generics this year Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Alex Hogan/STAT What is it? About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More What’s included? Ed Silverman Tags drug pricinggovernment agenciesMedicarepharmaceuticalspharmalittleSTAT+last_img read more

Can less be more? A heretical approach to chemotherapy is extending cancer patients’ lives

first_img Tags cancerpharmaceuticalsresearchSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Senior Writer, Science and Discovery (1956-2021) Sharon covered science and discovery. Dr. Robert Gatenby in his office at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla. Tina Russell for STAT GET STARTED Sharon Begley Health @sxbegle STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Can less be more? A heretical approach to chemotherapy is extending cancer patients’ lives center_img No scientist with even a rudimentary moral compass and an ounce of intellectual humility takes human experiments lightly, given how much can go wrong. But Dr. Robert Gatenby was especially aware of the stakes.An oncologist at Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa, Fla., he has spent years studying how tumor cells respond to chemotherapy, especially in patients whose cancer has metastasized well beyond the original tumor, as when malignant prostate cells invade bones like gang members expanding their turf. Now Gatenby was ready to put his theories to a real-world test by treating men with advanced prostate cancer in a way that broke all the rules. Log In | Learn More Unlock this article — and get additional analysis of the technologies disrupting health care — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED What is it? About the Author Reprints What’s included? By Sharon Begley Aug. 29, 2019 Reprints [email protected] last_img read more

‘Pharma doesn’t like fish oil’: Wall Street funds sold Amarin after big win with heart drug

first_img Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. GET STARTED About the Author Reprints Adobe Tags biotechnologySTAT+ What is it? @adamfeuerstein Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What’s included?center_img Wall Street fund managers lightened their stock positions in Amarin (AMRN) during the fourth quarter — an unexpected downshift in sentiment that suggests some doubt about the company’s ability to transform its fish-oil derived heart drug into a commercial blockbuster.The last three months of 2019 were good for Amarin, topped in December with a Food and Drug Administration decision to expand the approval of Vascepa. Amarin is now allowed to say the drug prevents heart attacks, strokes, and related health problems in people who are at high cardiovascular risk. The company believes Vascepa could now be prescribed to millions of Americans, leading to billions of dollars in new revenue. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. [email protected] Log In | Learn More By Adam Feuerstein Feb. 18, 2020 Reprints ‘Pharma doesn’t like fish oil’: Wall Street funds sold Amarin after big win with heart drug Adam’s Take Adam Feuersteinlast_img read more