Vermont Experiment Keeps Seniors at Home, Out of Nursing Homes

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreA unique experiment is under way in Vermont that allows older people to stay home and avoid nursing homes. Under Vermont’s Choices for Care program, Medicaid-eligible senior citizens who need home care can be tended by a family member, friend or neighbor, who is then paid by the state $10 per hour. That means 93-year-old Florence can keep her cat, tend her plants and attend a weekly 25-cent poker game with neighbors… (AP)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

EARTH ALERT ’08: Top Ten Good News for the Earth

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreHappy Earth Day! Here are the top ten good news stories for the environment… Since the first Earth Day in 1970, air quality has improved dramatically, rivers are cleaner, and many endangered species have been rescued from the brink. As every first grader is taught in school, the environment rocks! Let’s look at 10 points of light in the news about our Earth. #1) We can Breath Easier – The dramatic reduction in air pollution represents one of the greatest success stories in American government. Most Americans believe air pollution has been getting worse, but the truth is just the opposite: Air pollution levels have been dropping for decades. Since the first Earth Day, emissions from the most common air pollutants have decreased by about half, even while gross domestic product increased 195% and people increased their travel in cars by 178%.  Los Angeles, for example, had nearly two hundred hazardous days every year for smog in the 1970s but now experiences less than twenty-five heavy-ozone days each year. Lead has been eliminated entirely from the air, thanks to the introduction of unleaded gasoline, while levels of carbon monoxide are down by 70%. Europe achieved its goal of cutting pollution from coal-burning plants years ahead of schedule, reducing acid rain-causing sulphur dioxide by 65 percent since 1990. China is also surging ahead to curtail its pollution. In the last year it has increased fuel standards, closed ozone-producing checmical factories, invested in renewables, unplugged 253 coal-fired generators, and continued to spend its investment of $175 billion on environmental protection over 5 years. Rounding out the effort, thousands of citizens around the world aided in cleaning the air by planting a billion trees last year for the UN’s Billion Tree campaign. #2) Cleaner Water Rescues Fish and Birds from the Brink When the clean water act was passed in 1972, only 40% of the nation’s major rivers were safe enough for swimming. Today, about 70% are safe enough. This is one of reasons that endangered species like the brown pelican, the bald eagle, and the sturgeon are making a comeback. Bald eagles this year soared off the endangered species list after nearly four decades, their population climbing from a dismal count of just 417 nesting pairs in the continental United States in 1963 to more than 11,000 today. “Pelicans have roosted on the nation’s list of endangered species longer than nearly all other creatures,” reports the LA Times. Now thanks to the 1972 ban on DDT the pelican population is booming. In New York City’s Hudson River, Shortnose sturgeon became the first fish to be resurrected from the endangered species list. More than 60,000 occupy the river, greater by about four times than the number in 1970. Read about more species recovery in a GNN-i report. #3) Fewer People Trashing U.S. Roads, Beaches Americans are tossing less litter despite the fact that there are more people on the roads. “Experts estimate that deliberate trash-tossing has fallen about 2 percent a year since the mid-’70s in communities where it’s been measured.” #4)  Gorillas and Rhinos Making a Comeback A 10-year strategic plan was launched this year between Congo, Rwanda and Uganda to guarantee the continued recovery of the Mountain Gorilla.  Other African countries too are recognizing the importance of tourism and cracking down on poaching with 9 nations signing a pact in Paris. Ten million trees were planted by the World Wildlife Fund in the DR Congo shoring up a gorilla habitat once ravaged by war, and the best news was a 2007 survey showing the gorilla population rising 12 percent over the past decade in Uganda. Black rhino numbers, too, are up 20 percent in Kenya, after years of decline from poaching and habitat loss, a healthy increase that surpassed even conservationists targets. #5) Red Buses and Yellow Cabs Going Green London’s famous red buses and New York City’s yellow cabs will both be turning green in several years. By 2010, London’s double decker buses will run on hydrogen, producing zero pollution and much less noise. In New York, every yellow taxi cab will be a fuel-efficient hybrid by 2012. Add that to the million new trees set to be planted in the city alone, and you’ve got less heat on the street and cleaner air.   #6)  Wind Power Energizes 1 Million Homes and 1 Cargo Ship US installations powered by the wind jumped 63 percent last year — enough to power 1 million average homes — according to estimations by the American Wind Energy Association. And in February the first wind powered cargo ship (video) crossed the Atlantic pulled by a giant kite that cut its energy use by 20 percent. #7) CO2 in the Air? Why Not Suck it Out? A New Machine Does Just That Last year, in conjunction with Earth Day, Global Research Technologies officially introduced its unique CO2 vacuum cleaner in conjunction with Earth Day that can remove carbon dioxide from the air. Columbia University professor Klaus Lackner is the visionary who dreamed up the devices, which look like giant fly-swatters, and utilize a chemical compound that, when wet, absorbs the CO2 straight from the atmosphere. The founder of Land’s End before he died poured money into the start-up company to bring Lackner’s vision to market. #8) Three Massive New Sanctuaries Protect Wildlife in US,  Africa and Northwest Territories Three massive sanctuaries were erected in the last few years in far reaches of the globe to protect species that are found nowhere else. A new nature reserve in the Democratic Republic of Congo will become the world’s largest continuous protected area for great apes, larger than the state of Massachusetts. The Bush Administration in 2006 encircled Hawaii with the world’s largest marine preserve, home to 7000 marine species, at least a quarter of which are found nowhere else. The huge sanctuary is larger than all US National Parks combined, stretching the distance from Chicago to Florida. And this month the Canadian government announced the creating of a new giant national park covering some 1.9 million acres along one of the country’s most spectacular northern rivers. #9) Consensus: Gobal Warming Needs Fixing! Forces Rise to Take on Problem Thanks in part to Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth, and worldwide Live Earth concerts, the public consensus has finally confirmed that Global Warming can and should be a top priority.  More than 320 US mayors (even in big cities like New York, LA, Chicago, Seattle and Dallas) have joined together to adopt the Kyoto targets and take local action to reduce global warming pollution. Huge corporations convinced it is in their own interest to adopt stricter standards are also leading the way. 12 international companies including Nike, IBM and Sony joined in a Climate Savers Program to cut emissions by 7 % by 2010. Dell became the first major computer firm to go totally carbon neutral.  Leaders of the world’s major religions met in Greenland (video) to see climate change first-hand and pray. The Vatican is adding its voice to the chorus for change. The Pope even led an eco-rally for half million (video) youth. Perhaps the most telling sign that a consensus has been reached in American society: The US Fish and Wildlife Service admitted that the polar bear may indeed by threatened and proposed to add the species to its protection list, which would basically prohibit the government from taking any action that would exacerbate the plight of the bear, a groundbreaking development in 2007. #10) Trashing Plastic Bags It’s just a matter of time before single-use plastic bags are globally shunned, taxed or banned altogether. Tanzania, San Francisco and a Manitoba town now prohibit the use of the pesky plastic. A simple tax is another option embraced by Australia and Ireland, and stores like Whole Foods and Ikea. In 2002, an Irish tax of 33 cents per bag caused an immediate drop in usage by 94 percent. _____________________________________ For more good news about the environment and society, and for all the links to the Earth stories above in the Top Ten stories, visit the Good News Network at https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org. Formerly a TV news professional, Geri Weis-Corbley is founder and managing editor of the only comprehensive positive news website, now #1 on Google and celebrating its 12th anniversary on the web. https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org WANT TO USE THIS ARTICLE ON YOUR WEBSITE,  E-ZINE, OR BLOG? Just include the entire article along with this final paragraph! ____________________________________ last_img read more

Good News is Step Forward for Iranian Women

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore Iranian MPs have approved the first woman minister in the 30-year history of the Islamic republic. She was one of 18 nominations for President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s new cabinet to be approved. Two other women were among three rejected nominees. Also, US President Barack Obama has given Iran until later in September to agree to new talks on its nuclear programme, or face tougher sanctions. Tehran has said it is ready to present a new package of proposals to the international community, although the details have not been published.  (Continue reading at BBC) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Stand Up for the Gulf: Jay Leno to Perform Benefit for Oil Spill Victims

first_img”We did it for flood victims in Iowa; we did it for auto workers in Detroit; we did it for victims of Katrina and others. We tell a few jokes and help out people.”Tickets cost between $40 and $150 for the show at the MGM Beau Rivage Theatre in Biloxi. The $150 tickets include an exclusive Jay Leno meet & greet reception with hors d’oeuvres and cocktails.AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreTonight Show host Jay Leno will perform a benefit Saturday night for Mississippians impacted by the Gulf oil spill.Proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Gulf Coast Community Foundation’s Mississippi Oil Spill Recovery Fund, established to support non-profits working to help the state’s fishermen, coastal communities and wildlife impacted by the disaster.“It’s great to be able to do shows like this,” said Mr. Leno about the benefit, which carries the long title, Stand Up for the Gulf Coast: A Special Evening with Jay Leno to Benefit the Gulf Coast Community Foundation.last_img read more

General Mills to Remove Artificial Flavors, Colors From All Cereals

first_imgGeneral Mills Cereals plans to have more than 90 percent of the portfolio free of artificial colors and flavors by the end of 2016. Trix and Reese’s Puffs will be among the first to change, while cereals that contain marshmallows, like Lucky Charms, will take longer.In January, 2014 General Mills turned to all non-GMO ingredients for it’s Cheerios brand. It has converted its entire line of Big G cereals so that whole grains are the first, most prominent, ingredient and, by 2011, the company had lowered sugar levels in all cereals advertised to kids so they contained 10 grams of sugar or less per serving.(READ more from the Washington Post)AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore “We’ve continued to listen to consumers who want to see more recognizable and familiar ingredients on the labels and challenged ourselves to remove barriers that prevent adults and children from enjoying our cereals.”To get the familiar red, yellow and orange colors in Trix cereal, for instance, the company will be using spice extracts–annatto and turmeric– and fruit and vegetable juice, from sources like beets and berries. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreIt still may taste “magically delicious,” but Lucky Charms will soon undergo a makeover that could change the look of its yellow moons, pink hearts and green clovers.To keep up with consumer demand for natural ingredients, the General Mills company announced this week a commitment to removing artificial flavors and artificial colors from the rest of its cereals by the end of next year. Instead of dyes like Red No. 40 and Yellow No. 6, the company will use natural sources to color its popular breakfast foods.This is good news because artificial dyes, which are essentially petroleum by-products, have been linked to attention problems and hyperactivity in children. General Mills joins a host of companies, like Nestle and Kraft in a race toward healthier foods.Diet May Cut Risk of Alzheimer’s by 50% (Long-term Study of 900 Seniors)last_img read more

Pakistan Opens First Ever Violence Against Women Center

first_imgThe first of the centers was opened in Multan of the Punjab region. The entirely female-run shelter offers first aid, forensics, medical examination, rehabilitation, post-trauma, counseling, and mental health services, as well as legal assistance.RELATED: Former Child Brides Win Case in Court: Zimbabwe Bans Child MarriageThe installation of the institutions is a part of the Punjab Protection of Women Against Violence (PPWAV) Act passed by Punjab Chief Minister Mian Shahbaz Sharif in 2016. The legislation is expected to take a dramatic stance against domestic abuse and violence against women nationwide.“Now the situation has changed compared to the past when women go to the police station they are told to go back to their home and accept the violence in the absence of laws on violence against women,” said Shaista Bokhari, Executive Director of the Women’s Rights Association.The center’s workforce is comprised of 8 female police officers, including 2 inspectors, 2 assistant sub-inspectors, 3 head constables, and 21 female constables.Click To Share The News With Your Friends  – OR, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreWhile Pakistan might be a notorious region for female abuse, the country is taking steps towards better gender equality by opening up 36 different Violence Against Women Centers nationwide.last_img read more

Student Proves We Can Grow Millions of Pounds of Food By Planting it on Top of Trash

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis student’s plan to tackle food insecurity may sound unappetizing, but it’s actually pretty ingenious.Joy Youwakim, an economics student at the University of Texas, has proven that we can safely grow produce on top of inactive landfills. Using a 200-foot patch of land in a closed landfill southeast of Austin, Youwakim worked with her fellow students to grow 20 pounds of various crops, such as radishes, eggplant, bell peppers, cucumbers, and cantaloupe. All of the produce was then tested and declared safe by the Food Safety Net Services.If Youwakim expanded her efforts to include all 390 acres of the landfill, she would be able to grow enough food for over 8,000 families. There were more than 6,000 inactive landfills in 2012, which roughly amounts to over 2 million acres of unused land. If implemented nationwide, Youwakim’s experiment could spell the end for food insecurity.CHECK OUT: Instead of Arguing Online, Political Foes Are Coming Together Over Food to ‘Make America Dinner Again’The economics student says that she first got the idea for her initiative when she saw what an unused landfill actually looked like.“I was working at the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality one summer and struck up a conversation with an employee working in the landfill division,” she told the Good News Network. “When he showed me a picture of a closed landfill, I was so surprised to find that it looked more like a closed golf course than a pile of trash.“I’ve always been passionate about food access, so I immediately began thinking about the possibilities of growing food on this space. I learned that landfills are typically located in low income areas, so I saw this as an opportunity to bring fresh produce to individuals living in food deserts as well as a way to sustain farmable land as our population grows and we continue to urbanize.”LOOK: Cheap ‘Plant Pods’ That Can Grow More Lettuce in a Room Than Half-Acre Plot May End HungerAfter that, Youwakim says it took about 13 months of phone calls, proposals, and cutting through red tape to get the necessary food permits to conduct her experiment.Now, she has been nominated as one of four finalists for the General Mills Feeding Better Futures Scholars Program for a chance to win $50,000 to develop their food relief initiatives.Kate Stagliano, who is one of the other competition finalists, has been featured on Good News Network in the past for her incredible story about how a massive cabbage inspired her to start an organization that encourages youngsters to grow their own food for the needy.RELATED: How One Girl Fed Thousands Thanks to an Unusually Large CabbageWhether Youwakim wins or not, she says that she is excited to expand her initiative to other communities, one trash patch at a time.“Landfills are not an endangered resource they’re going to keep being around,” she told GNN. “When these landfills close, I want to use this space and grow food on top of them instead of abandoning them.”(WATCH the video below)Plant Some Positivity And Share The Good News With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

CEO Who Raised the Minimum Salary of His Employees to $70K is Now Doing It All Over Again

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreMany people recognize Dan Price as the CEO who slashed his own salary back in 2015 so he could raise the minimum wage at his company to $70,000 a year.The Seattle-based businessman is now making headlines all over again since he opened a new office in Idaho and announced that all of its staffers would be given the same salary.Price is the founder and CEO of Gravity Payments: a credit card processing company which he launched out of his college dorm room when he was only 19 years old. According to CNN, their new office in Boise used to belong to an independent company called ChargeItPro before it was acquired by Gravity in 2016. RELATED: Employees Surprise CEO Who Gave $70,000 Minimum Wage With A $70K TeslaAfter Price and his employees held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the office earlier this week, he announced that he would be raising their salaries to the $70,000 minimum before 2024.“This morning, we cut the ribbon on the new [Gravity Payments] Boise office AND announced that all of our employees here will start earning our $70k min salary,” wrote Price. “I’m so grateful to work with this amazing team and to be able to compensate them for the value they bring to our community.”This morning we cut the ribbon on the new @GravityPymts Boise office AND announced that all of our employees here will start earning our $70k min salary.I’m so grateful to work with this amazing team and to be able to compensate them for the value they bring to our community. pic.twitter.com/stwwJgYCqQ— Dan Price (@DanPriceSeattle) September 23, 2019 Price first got the idea for the pay raise in 2015 after reading a research paper on happiness which showed how extra money makes a big difference in the lives of people earning less than $70,000 a year.He managed to make it through the 2008 recession without laying off any employees or raising prices, despite losing 20% of his business. Since most of those young workers stuck with him through the hard times, he saw the wage increases as a way of returning that loyalty—even if it meant slashing his own salary from $1 million to the same $70K per year.MORE: Company Founder Surprises Employees With $20 Million—‘I wanted to show some gratitude’After all 70 of his workers benefited from the pay raise, Gravity Payments became flooded with business. In the week following his announcement, Price says the company recorded the best week for acquiring new clients in the 11 years since he founded it.Half a year after that, he found that his employees were more productive than ever; old customers were sticking with him; and his customer retention rate had risen from 91% to 95%, which was 37 points better than the national average.Now, he hopes that the new Idaho office will help to reap the same benefits for everyone involved—especially his employees.(WATCH the 2015 interview below) – Feature photo by Dan PriceBe Sure And Share The Good News With Your Friends On Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Man Donates Entire 25,000 Baseball Card Collection to 9-Year-old Girl Who Lost Hers in a Wildfire

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreLike hundreds of others, 9-year-old Reese Osterberg and her family were devastated to lose their home last month in California’s Fresno County Creek Fire.A huge baseball fan, Reese’s precious baseball card collection was also lost to flames. She’d been collecting since she was 6-years-old, and over three years she’d amassed an impressive 100 cards she was proud of.When the Fresno County Fire crew heard about Reese’s collection, they decided to do their bit. Spreading the word on Facebook, they asked if anyone could help a little girl by donating some of their own cards. Luckily, San Jose’s Kevin Ashford saw the post on social media. He told NBC Bay Area, “I got to thinking about what I had in the garage… I thought, you know, what of instead of selling them on eBay, I’m going to donate them. I’m gonna donate them all and put a smile on a little girl’s face.”RELATED: Performing Acts of Kindness Can Boost Both Physical Health and Happiness Levels, Study FindsSo that’s exactly what Kevin did. Given that he’s been amassing his baseball card collection since the 1990s, he had quite a few to donate.(WATCH Reese receive 25,000 baseball cards in the NBC Bay Area video below.)SHARE This Heartwarming Story With Your Pals on Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Football players tackle local service

first_imgAfter fielding questions from reporters about the upcoming Air Force game Tuesday, junior Cierre Wood lit up when he talked about Christian, a young boy he met at the South Bend Center for the Homeless this summer through a one-credit service learning course offered by the Center for Social Concerns (CSC). Co-taught by Professors Bill Purcell and Mike Hebbeler, the class combined guest speakers and lectures in the morning with community service activities in the afternoon. “[The class] gives [student-athletes] a way to engage with the community to learn about themselves,” Hebbeler said. “To be stretched, to be challenged and hopefully to experience opportunities that really speak to them in hopes of going forward.” Wood said becoming friends with Christian through the class reminded him of how blessed he was. “Everybody isn’t lucky enough to have a regular, normal life,” Wood said. “I see [these kids], and they’re still laughing and having fun, and taking life for what it is. It just makes you appreciate the little things you have in your life.” Wood said he keeps a picture in his locker that Christian gave him in gratitude of his friendship. “Everyone was playing duck, duck, goose, and [Christian] was just over there by himself,” Wood said. “I didn’t really like to see him over there by himself so I wanted to go over there an introduce myself to try to make a new friend… He gave me a picture, and on the back it said ‘Thank you for being my friend. I really appreciate everything that you’ve done.’ It really hit home for me.” According to a University press release, organizations participating in the course included the South Bend Center for the Homeless, the Logan Center, the Red Cross, La Casa de Amistad, Healthwin and the Perley Primary Center. Although open to all students, the class was geared toward student-athletes, whose schedules restrict them from engaging in much community service during the school year, Hebbeler said. “One of the purposes of the class is to give these student-athletes the opportunity to experience what the majority of Notre Dame students are experiencing,” Hebbeler said. “They’re very confined by their responsibilities as athletes.” Purcell said missing out on service opportunities because of athletic responsibilities deprives student-athletes of an important aspect of the Notre Dame experience. “[Service] is part of a Notre Dame education,” Purcell said. The theme of the course was “ethical leaders in service,” Purcell said, and touched on issues of race, economics, sexuality and ethics. According to the press release, 54 Notre Dame football players participated in the class this summer. “Some of them were reluctant at first because it was different,” Hebbeler said. “It was really great for Bill and I to see the transformation over the period of the course, [to see] guys really warming up to folks in the community and clients at these different organizations and forming real relationships, having discussions and listening to some of the challenges and developing empathy.” Purcell said both the student-athletes and the community members whom they helped this summer gained from the experience. “There’s a mutuality,” Purcell said. “They’re building the common good together by learning from each other.” Fifth-year senior David Ruffer also worked with children at the Center for the Homeless, and he said the friendships he made with the children there were truly genuine. “They broke down all these barriers and saw us as people who wanted to hang out with them, and as a result, they just wanted to hang out with us,” Ruffer said. “It’s pretty rare that people just look at us as people as opposed to Notre Dame football players. It was really refreshing that these kids were so straight with us.” Ruffer said his favorite experience was making friends with a young boy named Eric. “Me and my buddy Eric played a game where basically I had to kneel whenever he pointed his finger at me, and I was on the playground, so that was a lot of fun,” he said. “You could tell he had a lot of pent-up energy, so I was happy I could help him release some of it.” Senior Mike Golic Jr. worked at Healthwin, a specialized care facility. He said he enjoyed getting to know patients through facilitating different activities for them. “My favorite personally was when we did manicure day the first Friday we were there for the ladies there,” Golic said. “All of us got to get our hands dirty with that, paint some nails, and get out of our element a little bit. It was a lot of fun.” Golic said he gained a new perspective from witnessing the patients’ struggles. “We saw an 18-year-old girl who was a victim of a car accident who was just starting to blink again, and that was progress for her,” Golic said. “Every once and a while when you think you’re having a bad day… there are people out there who are really struggling with a lot, fighting through a lot, and you can draw strength from those people and what they go through.” Purcell said many of the student-athletes have continued their relationships with the organizations they worked with during the summer. “I know student-athletes have been invited to birthday parties, they continued volunteering at particular sites, and they’ve gone on and brought friends to the sites,” Purcell said. “I’ve even heard from [student-athletes’] parents … that they’ve been impacted.” Hebbeler said these experiences put the University’s mission into action. “All the CSC courses are focused on fulfilling the Notre Dame mission of educating the heart and mind,” Hebbeler said, “What a great opportunity for student-athletes to be a part of that and be formed in that way through these experiences.”last_img read more