UK housing market: Remortgaging spurred on by Bank of England interest rate hike threat

first_img Read This NextRicky Schroder Calls Foo Fighters’ Dave Grohl ‘Ignorant Punk’ forThe WrapThe Truth About Bottled Water – Get the Facts on Drinking Bottled WaterGayot’Drake & Josh’ Star Drake Bell Arrested in Ohio on Attempted ChildThe WrapDid Donald Trump Wear His Pants Backwards? Kriss Kross Memes Have AlreadyThe WrapCNN’s Brian Stelter Draws Criticism for Asking Jen Psaki: ‘What Does theThe WrapHarvey Weinstein to Be Extradited to California to Face Sexual AssaultThe Wrap’Black Widow’ First Reactions: ‘This Is Like the MCU’s Bond Movie’The WrapWatch President Biden Do Battle With a Cicada: ‘It Got Me’ (Video)The Wrap’The View’: Meghan McCain Calls VP Kamala Harris a ‘Moron’ for BorderThe Wrap Express KCS Tags: Bank of England UK house prices UK inflation UK interest rates by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailUndoUnify Health LabsRandy Jackson: This 3 Minute Routine Transformed My HealthUnify Health LabsUndoMoguldom NationFather Of 2 Sues Los Angeles Hospital After Wife Dies During ChildbirthMoguldom NationUndoSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictUndoMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekUndoPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunUndoComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyUndoForbesThese 10 Colleges Have Produced The Most Billionaire AlumniForbesUndoGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday NewsUndo whatsapp UK housing market: Remortgaging spurred on by Bank of England interest rate hike threat Show Comments ▼center_img whatsapp Share Wednesday 26 August 2015 9:24 pm Remortgaging has surged as the prospect of an interest rate rise leads homeowners to lock in better deals.The number of people switching to lower rates was 29 per cent higher in July than in the some month last year, figures released yesterday by the British Bankers’ Association (BBA) showed. “Savvy homeowners are snapping up competitive deals before an expected increase in interest rates,” said Richard Woolhouse, chief economist at the BBA.The Bank of England was expected to lift rates off their record lows around March next year, but this is now not expected until next summer as cheap commodities weigh on inflation. Intense competition between lenders has also helped drive down borrowing costs.“A fear of rising interest rates isn’t the only factor that can push remortgaging levels upwards. A positive combination of wage growth, low inflation and healthy house price growth is contributing to a mix of economic good news which is supporting the remortgage sector,” said Richard Sexton, director of e.surv chartered surveyors.“Many homeowners now have a much stronger financial footing. They are re-assessing their finances and switching to better rates while they can. At the moment, a wide array of record low deals remain, despite some initial withdrawals, and it is these that homeowners are tapping into.”Jody Baker, head of money at comparethemarket.com said: “It appears that rumours of an early interest rate rise have helped intensify mortgage lending in a significant way. “Our site has seen a 23 per cent spike in remortgage queries in July, as people rush to secure the best deals they can before possible rate rises kick in. Furthermore, there are early signs that the property market is starting to heat up again.” last_img read more

News / Pilot shortage threatens regional air cargo links, carrier association warns

first_img© Monika Wisniewska Regional freighter flights, including spokes connecting small communities to integrator hubs, are at risk from the worsening pilot shortage in the US, the Regional Air Cargo Carrier Association (RACCA) has warned. The lack of flight crews has been seriously aggravated by the introduction of new requirements for commercial airline pilots in 2013, which jacked up the minimum flight hours required six-fold from previously 250 to 1,500 hours, said RACCA president Stan Bernstein.“We have a serious crisis going on in our industry,” said RACCA chairman and Empire Airlines CEO Tim Komberec. “There’s much debate about the pilot shortage in the United States and in the world, but there is absolutely no doubt that at our level where we perform, where we recruit pilots from and where we are on the food chain, we have an extremely serious problem and it has taken on crisis proportions.”In February the plight of regional passenger airline company Republic Airways shone a glaring light on the issue. Republic, one of the largest regional operators in North America, filed for bankruptcy protection and blamed its predicament largely on a shortage of flight crews that forced it to ground aircraft.To date no regional freighter operator has gone to the wall because of the pilot shortage, and for the most part they have managed to operate their planes, but the situation is getting serious, according to Mr Bernstein.“We are just beginning to cancel flights,” he said. “Carriers no longer have reserve crews available.”He added that the outlook is grim, with no solution in sight. “There is no one in the pipeline. The costs of becoming a pilot are too high, the barriers to entry are too high.”Traditionally young pilots have joined regional carriers after graduation from flight school as the first rung of a career ladder in commercial aviation. However, this avenue has been effectively blocked by the change in minimum flying hours. The entry requirements were changed in response to the fatal crash of a regional passenger plane on the approach to Buffalo in February 2009.The new regime has been roundly criticised by commercial airlines, flight schools and industry organisation, as it opens up a huge chasm for aspiring pilots.“Many pilots graduate with 250 to 400 flying hours under their belt. There is no logical route to 1,500 hours,” said Mr Bernstein.RACCA has championed a proposal to allow young pilots to accrue flight hours on the right side of the cockpit, logging hours  as second-in-command pilots in on-demand operations otherwise authorized to operate with a single pilot. This would be more relevant than towing banners, Mr Bernstein said.The irony for regional carriers is that there is ample demand out there, and the rise in e-commerce promises further growth on that side – which translates into a lost opportunity for cargo carriers.“We are not experiencing any problems in our network at UPS,” a spokesman for UPS Airlines commented. “Because UPS pilots are among the best compensated in commercial aviation, and because of our stability in the volatile aviation industry, UPS is able to attract and retain a strong, experienced group of skilled pilots.”The majority of carriers are less well insulated.“Everybody is experiencing it, including UPS, FedEx and DHL,” said Mr Bernstein. “They themselves have no trouble getting pilots, but the regional carriers that fly for them are hit by this.”As they are at the bottom rung of the ladder, regional cargo carriers bear the brunt of the situation. “The second pilots obtain 1,500 hours they are off to American Eagle and other regionals that fly for the large mainline carriers. American Eagle just introduced a $15,000 sign-on bonus,” noted Mr Bernstein.This means that regionals not only cannot take advantage of demand, they face shrinkage down the road as more affluent, larger carriers poach their pilots. Ultimately this will affect the air transport network in the US, RACCA argues.“Millions of Americans are not going to get their online purchases delivered to their front door if the situation does not improve,” said Mr Bernstein. “The issue also has an immediate impact on manufacturing as well as medical testing and devices which our members have as part of their mission.”How grave the situation is going to be hinges on the outlook for the commercial airline industry in the US altogether. “It’s difficult to predict how many small communities may lose air cargo service,” said Mr Bernstein. “We live by what the mainline carriers do. If they expand, they raid more pilots from us.” By Ian Putzger 22/06/2016last_img read more

Premium / Analysis: first signs of stress push CH Robinson toward a crossroads

first_img Please either REGISTER or login below to continue << Go back Forgotten your password? Please click here Premium subscriber LOGIN Email* Please Login Email* New Premium subscriber REGISTER LOGIN Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium Password* By Alessandro Pasetti 20/09/2017 In May 2015, I argued that it was hard to find cracks in the way CH Robinson was run, observing that the US-headquartered 3PL had historically demonstrated sound financial discipline – but, “nonetheless”, I also noted, “delving into its financials and its stock performance, it appears to have arrived at a crossroads”.At the time, its stock traded in the mid-$60s, much the same as its level on 20 July this year, when it hit a 52-week low of $63.4 in ... Reset Your Password Resetlast_img read more

Premium / Supply chain radar: Schenker rumoured to have approached CMA CGM ‘for parts’ of the group

first_img Reset The obvious question for most of my trade sources both in Europe and stateside is: did CMA CGM buy Ceva Logistics on a whim, given how the group’s consolidated financials look currently? Saying “they are horrible”, as one executive put it this week, would be an understatement – surely, the carrier needs help to monetise its likely upcoming divestment push, and swiftly.Elsewhere, many others are fully focused on the fortunes of DB Schenker, which is on the radar of most as it … << Go back Please Login Password* Premium subscriber LOGIN By Alessandro Pasetti 18/09/2019 Email* Email* LOGIN Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium New Premium subscriber REGISTER Forgotten your password? Please click here Please either REGISTER or login below to continue Reset Your Passwordlast_img read more

How to respond to North Korea’s 5th nuclear test: stimulate internal…

first_imgAnalysis & Opinion RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Analysis & Opinion How to respond to North Korea’s 5th nuclear test: stimulate internal pressure with information SHARE AvatarLee Kwang Baek, UMG, President Facebook Twitter Is Nuclear Peace with North Korea Possible? center_img Analysis & Opinion Tracking the “unidentified yellow substance” being dried out near the Yongbyon Nuclear Center By Lee Kwang Baek, UMG, President – 2016.09.12 1:23pm Analysis & Opinion Despite repeated warnings and strong sanctions from the international community, Kim Jong Un has conducted another nuclear test. A mere eight months have passed since North Korea’s fourth nuclear test in January. We know what the regime’s aim is: to continue developing nuclear weapons and missiles to the point that they are ready for use in battle. The regime believes nuclear weapons and missiles are a shield, protecting it from internal and external threats. That being the case, how should we respond? The international community has adopted strong sanctions and is already exerting strong military pressure on Kim Jong Un’s regime. It might even be difficult to ratchet up the intensity of these measures. In terms of military options, the only thing stronger than the current strategy would be a preemptive strike. International sanctions and external pressure are not sufficient to block the progress of nuclear and missile development and provocations. We need a new strategy, one that stimulates change from within and weakens Kim Jong Un’s grip on power. It is possible to weaken Kim Jong Un’s power base by changing the consciousness of ordinary North Koreans. This involves separating the people from the regime. The people lack sufficient access to outside information. They are told that “North Korea is a socialist paradise on earth, thanks to Kim Jong Un.” They are instructed that “South Koreans are living in poverty and subject to violence by the American Imperialists.” The real heart of any society is its people. As North Korean people’s consciousness changes, so too will the system and regime.  The U.S. Department of State recently submitted a report to Congress detailing strategies to help the North Korean people gain  access to outside information. It included exploring options related to importing media players – such as radios, USBs, “notetel [portable media players produced in China],” MP3s, and smartphones – into North Korea to ensure that more North Korean residents acquire access to outside information. The BBC will also soon begin broadcasting a radio service into North Korea.  In South Korea, the Ministry of National Defense and intelligence agencies conduct North Korea-facing psychological operations. With American support, civil organizations in South Korea broadcast into North Korea to inform the North Korean people. However, the current level of effort is not significant enough to provoke lasting change. In order to change their consciousness, weaken the regime, and escape the cycle of nuclear and missile provocations, we need to make outside information available to at least half of the population. To do that, we need to increase our current efforts ten-fold.    In order to strengthen the intensity of this effort, four initiatives are important. First, the South Korean government should provide radio time to civil organizations so they can increase broadcast time. These organizations are currently renting airtime from radio stations in Central Asia. That means that the signal can be weak and difficult to hear by the time it arrives in North Korea. If South Korea provides this air time, it will be much easier to deliver more information by reaching a wider audience with a higher quality signal. Second, KBS Hanminjok Radio needs to increase the importance of its North Korea programming. This station currently broadcasts to overseas Koreans in China, Russia, and Japan. It also broadcasts TV to all of these countries, excluding North Korea. The strongest radio signal reaching North Korea is, in fact, the KBS Hanminjok Radio signal. There is reason to examine altering and customizing the KBS Hanminjok Radio programs that are transmitted into North Korea, considering it presents such a unique media environment and social situation. Third, defectors should be assisted so that they can more easily communicate with their friends and relatives back in North Korea. These kind of interactions are already occurring, including making phone calls to friends and relatives and providing them with USBs loaded up with Korean movies and dramas. However, these efforts can be significantly increased. Fourth, it will be important to contact and give information to North Koreans living abroad. Almost 190,000 North Koreans received a personal travel permit and spent time in China in 2015. These individuals are using smartphones to consume Korean dramas, news, movies, music, and comedy programs. This audience pool should be targeted and given better access to information tailored to their tastes and needs.   The country that is most proactively pursuing measures relevant to the introduction of foreign media into North Korea is  the United States. However, South Korea is geographically closer and will ultimately be North Korea’s partner in unification.  Getting information to North Koreans in order to change their consciousness is a task that is integral to the pursuit of peace in Northeast Asia, the human rights problem in North Korea, and the unification of the peninsula. Those working to advance this cause – both in governments and in the private sector – should meet at once in order to make a plan and prepare the appropriate legislation.   Pence Cartoon: “KOR-US Karaoke”last_img read more

ScotiaFunds to reduce fees on mutual funds, portfolios

first_img Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter ScotiaFunds, a division of 1832 Asset Management LP, which in turn is a Scotiabank subsidiary, will implement the new pricing model on Jan. 10. “Management fees have been simplified by offering four distinct pricing levels for fixed-income, equity income/dividend income, balanced and equity funds,” the announcement states in reference to fee reductions for individual mutual funds. “This means there will no longer be a premium within a category for specialty, foreign or focused mandates.” Management fee reductions will also affect Scotia Selected Portfolios, Scotia Partners Portfolios and Scotia Aria Portfolios. Further details on the fee reductions and the specific products that will be affected can be found on this ScotiaFunds backgrounder document. Photo copyright: andreypopov/123RF Toronto-based Bank of Nova Scotia’s fund management arm announced on Monday that it’s introducing a simplified pricing model for its mutual fund lineup, which will result in lower management fees on 51 Scotia funds as well as some portfolios. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Tessie Sanci Unitholders approve changes to NEI funds IAP calls on regulators to eliminate embedded compensation HSBC changes strategy, lowers fees for global equities fund Desjardins to close four ETFs Keywords MERs and management feesCompanies Bank of Nova Scotia last_img read more

PenderFund names new SVP for investments

first_img Keywords Appointments IE Staff Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Manulife names global head of growing private markets business announcement BrAt_PiKaChU iStock Related news TD getting new head of private wealth, financial planning In the newly created senior vice-president role, Scott will align the firm’s investment focus with its clients’ needs, a release from PenderFund said. CI GAM names its first-ever head of investment management Vancouver-based PenderFund Capital Management Ltd. has appointed Geoff Scott as senior vice-president, investments.Scott joined PenderFund last month from Cambridge Global Asset Management, a division of CI Investments. He previously worked for AGF Management Ltd. and Manulife Financial. Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

New authority could transform Māori health, but only if it’s a leader, not a partner

New authority could transform Māori health, but only if it’s a leader, not a partner As part of a major overhaul of the health system, health minister Andrew Little yesterday announced a new Māori health authority.Authors Dominic O’Sullivan Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, Auckland University of Technology and Professor of Political Science, Charles Sturt University Heather Came Senior Lecturer, Auckland University of Technology The authority will be able to commission primary health services and make joint decisions with a newly created centralised health agency. It’s a simple idea, and one with radically transformative potential. But it’s not new.In 2019, the Waitangi Tribunal found consistent Crown failure in the health care and well-being of Māori. It recommended establishing an independent authority to oversee Māori primary health services.The government’s announcement responds to a 2020 Health and Disability System review, which also called for a separate Māori health authority, but could not come to a consensus on the powers it should have. Four of the six members thought the idea that it should have the power to commission health services had such merit they dissented from the recommendation the authority should have only advisory powers.The potential is for a Māori primary health system explicitly focused on Māori needs. Māori decision makers would decide what needs to be done, how and by whom. The success of the authority hinges on how independent it will be, and its accountability to Māori people.By Māori for MāoriThe 2019 Waitangi Tribunal report also found that decision-making models don’t adequately reflect Māori experiences of what works and why. Tureiti Lady Moxon, one of the claimants to the tribunal, explained the proposed authority’s logic:We would prefer to be the designers of our own destiny.While the new authority will provide policy advice, its most important influence will come from the decisions it makes about the primary health services to purchase and from whom. It will then be able to decide whether these providers do a good enough job to have their funding continued.Opposition leader Judith Collins claimed there wouldn’t be much public support for a “separatist model” that would give “people operations based on race, not on need”.But the idea that anybody would demand an operation they don’t need is not a sensible starting point for the serious debate we need to have about how the authority should work with other parts of the revamped health system.Getting funding levels right and eliminating racismThe tribunal found chronic underfunding is one of the reasons for poor Māori health outcomes. It recommended the Crown and the health inquiry claimants work out a methodology for determining how much money is needed to achieve fair outcomes.It’s a complex question at the intersection of te Tiriti o Waitangi policy, moral philosophy and health economics. Answering it accurately will determine how well the authority can do its job.But an equally important question is the institutional racism the tribunal found in the health system, and how this gets in the way of people’s opportunities for good health.Many questions remain about the scope the authority will have to develop the health system to give everybody the same opportunity for good health.How will it be accountable to Māori as well as to the health minister? How will Māori be able to show they have confidence in the knowledge and expertise of the people appointed to the authority?What relationships will it have with the ministry of health and the newly created public health agency? How independent will it be and will there be significant Māori engagement in the ministry’s oversight function?Yesterday’s announcement spoke of enabling Māori “leadership and partnership“. But leadership and partnership don’t always work well together.The bicultural partnership people often read into te Tiriti o Waitangi (the Māori text) or the Treaty of Waitangi (English version) usually positions the Crown as senior partner and Māori as the junior partner. This view doesn’t foster the independent leadership the authority will need if it’s to make a real difference and, as the health minister said, give “true effect to tino rangatiratanga“, or Māori people’s authority to make decisions for themselves.Considering te Tiriti in all decisionsWe have developed the Critical Tiriti Analysis policy framework, which could help ensure the transformed health system respects te Tiriti and puts the Māori health authority in the best position to succeed.The framework requires policy makers to consider how te Tiriti informs both existing and new policies. In relation to yesterday’s announcements, it provokes the following questions:How will the health system maintain tika (correct) relationships with mana whenua (groups with authority over land), mātāwaka (kinship groups) and other Māori communities?How will the health system’s processes, actions and decision making be informed and shaped by Māori worldviews?How will Māori-led decision making and leadership (which is a bigger aspiration than partnership) be put into practice across the sector?How will barriers to Māori advancement, such as institutional racism, be eliminated?Given the history of health inequities, how will resources be distributed and prioritised to ensure equitable outcomes for Māori?How will Māori worldviews, values, tikanga (correct processes) and wairuatanga (spirituality) be normalised within the health system?The proposed changes are potentially transformative. But just how transformative depends on how these questions are answered and on the strength of the government’s commitment to no further breaches of te Tiriti.Abolishing the authority, as the opposition National party proposes, would be such a breach.Dominic O’Sullivan was a parliamentary candidate for the Labour party in 1990 and 1993.Heather Came is affiliated with New Zealand Public Health Association, STIR: Stop Institutional Racism and Tāmaki Tiriti Workers. /Courtesy of The Conversation. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Auckland, Commission, disability, Government, health, health economics, health minister, health services, leadership, New Zealand, operation, Professor, public health, resources, technology, university read more

Government must ignore bluster of Netflix and Free TV and mandate local content obligations

first_imgGovernment must ignore bluster of Netflix and Free TV and mandate local content obligations The federal government must stay the course on the introduction of new content rules for Netflix and other streaming video services.A content investment obligation for streaming video on demand (SVOD) services is needed to ensure Australian audiences have access to programming that is relevant to their lives and supports the domestic screen industry.The Media, Entertainment & Arts Alliance is concerned at media reports that Netflix has been joined by free-to-air commercial television networks in opposing content regulation.Revenue and audiences for SVOD providers are rapidly increasing, making Australia one of the most lucrative markets in the world. They should be required to invest a proportion of those earnings back into Australian content, said MEAA Chief Executive Paul Murphy.“Australian content rules, expressed either as hours per year or as a proportion of company revenues, should be seen as an indispensable cost of doing business in Australia,” he said.“Content rules provide Australian audiences with programs they want to watch, provide cultural reference points and sustain a large chunk of our creative industries.“The government’s media reform green paper talks at length about the merits of requiring the production of Australian content.“It acknowledges that Australia is a relatively small marketplace and that without content rules, broadcasters and operators would either stop or massively reduce investment in screen productions.“We need to heed the warnings in the green paper and get cracking on establishing an new and fair way for multi-billion-dollar companies to better serve the Australian market.”Mr Murphy said the viewing public should be sceptical of reasons put forward by Netflix and free TV for opposing content rules.“We hope that the noise being generated by the green paper process will subside and that a sensible accommodation of all parties’ interest – including Australian consumers and workers – is arrived at soon.“There is undeniable value in Australian content.“It is the function of our regulatory system to give broadcasters, streaming services and others a prod in the right direction.“Without such prods, the Australian production system would be vastly diminished, great stories will not be told and audiences will continue to be fed a diet of programs that are cheap and hard to consume.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Australia, Australian, business, cost of doing business, Entertainment, federal government, Government, industry, Investment, MEAA, Media, Entertainment and Arts Alliance, Netflix, production, regulation, revenue, streaming, video servicelast_img read more

Two CU-Boulder Specialty Programs Ranked High In US News & World Report

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Two University of Colorado at Boulder specialty programs were ranked in the top 15 nationally in the U.S. News & World Report’s 2004 rankings of America’s Best Colleges as reported on the magazine’s Web site, http://www.usnews.com. CU-Boulder’s undergraduate program in aerospace engineering sciences was ranked ninth among public universities offering doctoral degrees and 13th among both public and private doctoral universities. The Leeds School of Business undergraduate entrepreneurship program was ranked eighth among public universities and 14th among public and private national universities. The aerospace engineering program is known for its rigorous, hands-on curriculum, which prepares students to assume leadership positions in the design, testing and operation of aerospace and related systems, said professor and department chair Charbel Farhat. Among the department’s notable undergraduate alumni are NASA astronauts Scott Carpenter, Vance Brand, Marsha Ivins and the late Stuart Roosa and Ellison Onizuka. “We are pleased to be recognized among the nation’s top aerospace programs as we are committed to graduating students who have the hands-on skills and experience necessary to be successful in the field,” said Farhat. “Entrepreneurship is a strategic priority for the Leeds School of Business and we are glad to see this recognized by U.S. News,” said Dean Steven Manaster. The CU-Boulder entrepreneurship program is supported by the Robert H. and Beverly A. Deming Center for Entrepreneurship, said Manaster. In addition to the undergraduate ranking, the MBA entrepreneurship program has been ranked among the top 20 by U.S. News for four consecutive years. The entrepreneurship program at the Leeds School was also ranked 10th by business faculty and 14th overall in Entrepreneur Magazine’s 2003 survey of the top 100 entrepreneurial colleges. The CU-Boulder doctoral level entrepreneurship program was ranked first in the nation by the International Council of Small Businesses in 1997. Published: Sept. 1, 2003 last_img read more