DNV GL PV monitoring base grows to 5 GW with GreenPowerMonitor acquisition

first_imgDNV GL PV monitoring base grows to 5 GW with GreenPowerMonitor acquisitionIndependent energy consultancy firm acquires the Spanish monitoring and control platform to pool more than 5 GW of global solar PV under their collective monitoring umbrella. July 8, 2016 Ian Clover Markets Markets & Policy Share DNV GL, a global consultancy for clean energy projects, has announced today the acquisition of Spanish firm GreenPowerMonitor for an undisclosed sum. The deal sees DNV GL assume ownership of GreenPowerMonitor’s global monitoring platform, aligning its portfolio with DNV GL’s own to create a partnership serving the monitoring and control needs of more than 5 GW of installed solar around the world. GreenPowerMonitor will, as part of the acquisition, be given access to DNV GL’s global network, while DNV GL will benefit from the expertise of GreenPowerMonitor’s 56 software experts that serve more than 200 customers globally. According to DNV GL group president CEO Remi Eriksen, the deal brings together world-leading domain knowledge, technical expertise and digital deliver platforms passed on data-driven monitoring services for solar customers. DNV GL Energy CEO Ditlev Engel added: “Global installed PV is expected to triple over the next five years and by 2025 it should be the most economical form of electricity in many regions of the world. By joining forces with GreenPowerMonitor, we will be able to better support the industry in its growth ambitions.” GreenPowerMonitor CEO Juan Carlos Arevalo stressed that the company’s full teams in Barcelona and California will continue to serve existing customers going forward. “This transaction will strengthen our global delivery capabilities and continued technological development.”Popular content ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. This should be ma… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. In the Europea… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. This should be ma… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. In the Europea… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… 123456Share Ian Clover Ian joined the pv magazine team in 2013 and specializes in power electronics (inverters) and battery storage. Ian also reports on the UK solar market, having worked as a print and web journalist in Britain for various multimedia companies, covering topics ranging from renewable energy and sustainability to real estate, sport and film.More articles from Ian Clover [email protected] Related content Asia Pacific’s solarized digitization agenda Selva Ozelli, Esq. 23 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The virtual 7th Asia-Pacific Climate Change Adaptation Forum was hosted in March by Japan’s Ministry of the Environment,… Submarine cable to connect 10.5 GW wind-solar complex in Morocco to the UK grid Emiliano Bellini 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com UK-based Xlinks is planning to build 10.5 GW of wind and solar in Morocco and sell the power generated by the huge plant in the UK. 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After 10 years of delays, regional pilot schemes and general uncertaint… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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A focus purel… Polysilicon from Xinjiang: a balanced view pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As of March, the United States and Europe were considering sanctions on polysilicon from Xinjiang, China, due to concerns over forced labor. 10 GW is just the beginning Blake Matich 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Giant PV and wind projects are taking shape in Australia’s north, with the aim of supplying Asia with the clean energy i… Curtailing corrosion: making mounting structures last pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Raw material quality is vital for solar power plants, particularly given higher expectations for their lifetimes, as 30+… iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Police officer called for ‘vicious’ pit bull said the dog was ‘really loving’

first_imgTexarkana Police Department(TEXARKANA, Texas) — When police were called to wrangle a “vicious” pit bull from a residential neighborhood in Texas, the responding officer said he realized almost instantly that the animal in question was just a big softy.Texarkana Police officer Travis Frost said he first spotted the large tan-colored dog sprawled out on someone’s front porch. Before he approached, Frost said he left the door open to his squad car in case he needed to “jump back in if the dog was vicious and came after him.” Officer Frost whistled at the dog who immediately trotted towards him wagging his tail. The dog got a nice pat down before he hopped into the front seat of the patrol car, ready for his first ride-along. “He went right up to the patrol unit, jumped in the front seat and just made himself at home,” Frost said. Frost waited with the dog and snapped some photos with his new furry friend before animal control officers arrived to help track down its owners.“While you should always be careful around any dog that you don’t know, you shouldn’t automatically assume that all pit bulls are bad dogs,” Frost explained. “They might be really loving like this guy was this morning.”Animal Care and Adoption Center Texarkana tracked down the owners through the dog’s microchip, authorities said, and they picked up their dog within 24 hours.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Real estate data firm Cherre raises $50M

first_img Email Address* The startup, which was founded in 2016, created a platform that aggregates public and private data from different real estate sources (such as Trepp and Moody’s Analytics) and allows its clients to customize what information they receive about their properties.Its CEO L.D. Salmanson told Business Insider that the product has “exploded in popularity” in the wake of the pandemic, as more of its commercial real estate clients wanted concrete data on things like occupancy and migration rates.[BI] — Amy PlittContact Amy Plitt Message* Cherre CEO L.D. Salmanson (Cherre/Facebook)Third time’s a charm for Cherre, a real estate data platform.The startup announced that it’s raised $50 million in a new funding round, according to Business Insider. The round was led by Trustbridge Partners, a Chinese growth equity firm that has also invested in WeWork China, among other firms. The new round — Cherre’s third since 2018 — brings its total investments to $75 million, though it declined to disclose how much it’s currently valued at.Cherre previously raised $16 million from Intel Capital, the software giant’s venture capital arm. In 2018, it raised $9 million in a seed round led by Navitas Capital.Read moreIntel is now investing in real estate tech startups This startup just raised $9M to bring AI into real estate investment Full Name*last_img read more

Charges brought after South Bend man’s death at Indiana prison

first_img By Associated Press – August 31, 2019 0 340 IndianaLocalNews Charges brought after South Bend man’s death at Indiana prison Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Pinterest (Photo supplied) BUNKER HILL, Ind. (AP) — Authorities in Indiana say charges have been brought in the separate slayings of two inmates at the Miami Correctional Facility.Indiana State Police announced Thursday that 53-year-old inmate Phillip Sadler has been charged with murder in the June 10 smothering death of 70-year-old Lannie Morgan of South Bend. A not guilty plea has been entered for Sadler and he requested a lawyer.Also Thursday, police announced 42-year-old Michael Parrish is charged with murder in the May 19 strangulation death of his cellmate, 56-year-old Richard Carrell. A not guilty plea has been entered for Parrish and he requested a lawyer.Court records Friday didn’t list the name of a public defender in either case.The Miami Correctional Facility is located near Bunker Hill, about 60 miles (97 kilometers) north of Indianapolis. Google+ Twitter Pinterest Facebook Previous articleGovernor Holcomb ‘disgusted’ by texts official sent internNext articleFlight attendant agrees to undergo alcohol abuse counseling Associated PressNews from the Associated Press and its network of reporters and publications.last_img read more

Kroc Institute fellow discusses Arab Spring research

first_imgWill Moore, a visiting research fellow at the Kroc Institute and Florida State University professor of political science, addressed the shortcomings of popular perspectives on the events of the Arab Spring. He revisited the dissent and revolutions in the Middle East on Tuesday during the lecture “Dissent, Repression and Outcomes of the Arab Spring.” “Conventional Arab Spring narratives are unpersuasive because they don’t focus on outcomes,” he said. “These narratives also have a very strong ‘blame the victim’ approach, which is ahistorical.” Moore said there should be a focus on the behavior and interactions of dissidents and states. He discussed 24 instances of mass protests in four different countries — Algeria, Egypt, Jordan and Syria — since 1990 and said it was significant that only one of those protests resulted in a victory for the dissidents. “Unless you start paying attention to the interaction of states and dissidents, you can’t understand the outcomes,” he said. Moore outlined the research methodology and theoretical approach for his current project, which will supply the content for an eventual book on the subject. “I don’t yet have the answers to the questions I’m addressing. I’m going to be laying out how I’ve designed a research project,” he said. Eventually, the project will include case studies for every country in the entire Middle East and North Africa, as well as further analyses for the period of 1990 to 2011, Moore said. Currently, he is focused on 10 countries in particular and only has access to data from 1990 to 2004. “During this time and in all of these countries, dissidents and states are interacting. In every single one of these 10 nations, there is a long history of people challenging government and government responding in kind,” Moore said. During the lecture, Moore displayed a graph of dissident and state activity in each of the 10 countries and pointed out that some, such as Tunisia, stood out as having less dissident activity. The data came from a database of news reports, he said. “Something I have to consider is whether there is less news coverage or actually less dissident activity,” he said. Moore said he intends to evaluate the behavior of two actors, the state and the dissidents, along a Hostility-Cooperation Continuum. He said the continuum shows how one side responds to the behavior of the other and how both the desire to stay in power and the influence of constituents are important in determining this behavior. “If you’re halfway up the hostility scale, my people want me slightly … more hostile than you,” Moore said. Moore said the continuum allows him to estimate the average behavior when the other actor does nothing. For example, the state will be very cooperative on average when the dissidents do nothing. He said he can also estimate the average responsiveness to surprise for each actor, though his calculations do not differentiate between hostile and cooperative responses to surprises. Moore said his current data reveals interesting patterns, but he has not analyzed the set thoroughly enough to draw any conclusions. “I haven’t delved into how much I can trust these particular estimates,” he said. “I’m showing you a flavor of what I’m going to be able to do,” Moore said his project might not lead to the kind of results he hopes for, but he believes it addresses something existing literature is missing. “Does this project that I’ve launched give me any leverage? It’s possible I’ll strike out,” he said. “I’ve argued existing scholarship ignores behavior and limits our ability to understand and answer important questions. The missing objective of inquiry is the behavior of dissidents and states.”last_img read more

Haywood James Phillips

first_img As well as Aunts, Uncles and a host of Cousins, Nieces and Nephews.A graveside service is scheduled for Saturday May 2, 2020 at 11:00 AM at the Sabine Pass Cemetery in Sabine Pass, TX. On April 19, 2020 Haywood peacefully passed away in his home in Port Arthur, TX where he has resided for 35 years.He is proceeded in death by his Mother: Luella Marie Phillips-Francois, his Sister: Dorothy Francois, and two Brothers: George Michael Francois and Marlin Wayne Francois. He leaves to cherish his memories his Wife: Betty Guillory-Phillips; his Father: Lloyd “Lightning” Francois, Sr. (Betty Francois); Step-daughter: Kenyatta Guillory; Four Sisters: Kim Phillips-Spikes (Harvey), Catina Newman (Curtis), Emily Francois and Karliss Francois; Five brothers: Lloyd Francois Jr. (Tammy), Thomas Francois, Samuel Francois, William Francois (Vi’Joycelyn) and Kody Francois.center_img Haywood James Phillips was born to Luella Marie Phillips-Francois October 13, 1964 in Port Arthur, Texas.A native of Sabine Pass, Texas Haywood was raised in the home of his Great Grandparents Ernestine and Merrill Williams where he attended Sabine Pass ISD and worked as a commercial fisherman his entire adult life.last_img read more

EPA presses state for more details on Lake Champlain cleanup

first_imgby John Herrick vtdigger.org The Environmental Protection Agency wants to see a stronger commitment from the state to clean up Lake Champlain. In a letter to state environmental and agriculture officials last week, the EPA pressed for more details on a plan to reduce phosphorus loading into Lake Champlain. The feds asked the state to provide specific policy commitments, timelines and details, including outcome measures and the delegation of authority.DEC Commissioner David Mears. VTDigger photo‘In general, you know, it was a sobering letter in that EPA is asking for a lot of additional detail,’ said David Mears, commissioner of the Department of Environmental Conservation, who is part of the team orchestrating the cleanup.Last fall, the department and the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets released a draft plan for restoring the Lake Champlain Basin. The EPA ordered the state to revise its total maximum daily load (TMDL), which sets targets for phosphorus loading into Lake Champlain, or face federal funding cuts and tightened regulations for facilities around the lake, among other regulatory pressures.Phosphorus from sewage, farm runoff and stormwater is blamed for fueling algae blooms that persistently crop up in areas of the lake.With a plan in place, the EPA wants details and commitments by the end of March. After the proposal is finalized, the EPA will decide whether to approve the plan as soon as this summer.‘They want to know timelines by when we would implement these programs, what it would take to implement them in terms of authority ‘ whether we have the authority or not, how do we get it if we don’t. And also resources: what do we need to implement, in terms of staffing or helping to put money out on the ground for our partners,’ Mears said.The letter calls on the agencies to ‘provide final policy commitments in a basin-wide scale implementation plan,’ including a commitment letter from Gov. Peter Shumlin by the end of April.‘They recognize this is going to be a multiyear process, but there has to be a down payment this year; there has to be a demonstration of good faith,’ said Anthony Iarrapino, a lawyer with the Conservation Law Foundation, which has long advocated for lake cleanup.This year’s major water quality bill, H.586, is being reviewed in the Committee on Fish, Wildlife & Water Resources. The bill would alter agriculture and livestock practices and require new road and bridge standards, among other provision, to limit phosphorus runoff into Vermont’s water bodies.Mears said many of the state’s agencies are on board with the proposal, which would apply new water runoff standards across the state. Many lawmakers support the concept of cleaning up the lake, but need to see more details before they enact legislation, Mears said.The letter asks that the cleanup proposal include a plan that acknowledges the realities of climate change, such as higher intensity rainfall. Specifically, the proposal should include phosphorus projections outlined by previous EPA reports that detail several climate scenarios.‘These measures will be a critical component of the implementation of a revised Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for the lake,’ David Deegan, a public affairs officer for the New England Region of EPA, wrote in an email to VTDigger. ‘EPA’s letter applauds the scope and ambition of the Proposal while noting that aggressive application of all the measures will be needed to achieve water quality standards in the lake. The letter also lays out EPA’s expectations for the remaining planning for the TMDL as well as implementation after issuance by EPA later this year.’The letter says that current water quality models suggest that all the state’s proposals would have to be fully implemented to achieve required water quality standards set by the EPA.‘What I took the letter to basically say is that this is a good start, but it doesn’t go far enough,’ Mears said. ‘But, I think in terms of not going far enough, it was more that they wanted some more detail about the proposal, rather than they wanted some new initiatives added on to it.’EPA LETTERPHOTO: Silt flows heavily into Lake Champlain during a record flood in May 2011. Photo courtesy governor’s office.last_img read more

City $23 million off the hook in Burlington Telecom settlement with CitiBank

first_imgMayor Miro Weinberger announced Monday that the City of Burlington and Citibank have reached a Mediated Settlement Agreement in the Burlington Telecom lawsuit, which will settle the $33-plus million lawsuit for $10.5 million, plus a share of BT’s future value.  The settlement is expected to be funded largely from BT revenues and non-City sources and will avoid removal of BT’s fiber optic system.  Earlier today, federal district court judge The Honorable William K Sessions, III, granted the parties’ joint request to stay the litigation to allow for implementation of the settlement agreement, following City Council approval and Vermont Public Service Board action.  ‘I am pleased to announce to the people of Burlington that with this agreement, there is now for the first time a clear path to resolution of our BT challenges,’ said Mayor Weinberger.  ‘The agreement ‘ once completed in the months ahead ‘ will accomplish all the goals the City has pursued over the past two years.’ The Administration’s long-stated BT goals have been to:Protect taxpayers from further BT-related losses;Maintain BT service for its more than 4,000 customers;Preserve BT as a telecommunications competitor to maintain affordable Internet, cable, and telephone services for Burlington residents and businesses;Restore Burlington’s credit rating; andSecure, if possible, the opportunity for recovery of a portion of the $16.9 million spent by the City prior to 2010. Additionally, in the last year, the Administration added the goal of securing the right partner for BT that is committed to working with the City on its BTV Ignite economic and community development initiative. This agreement will give the City the opportunity to achieve all these goals through a settlement that includes the following major elements:The $33+ million Citibank lawsuit will be dismissed fully in exchange for $10.5 million of payments to Citibank from the following funding sources: o    Approximately $6 million in bridge financing from a special situation lender ‘ the terms of this financing, which will be secured entirely by BT revenues and assets, currently are under negotiation (paragraph 4.1(i) of Settlement Agreement); o   $1.469 million from co-defendant McNeil, Leddy & Sheahan, P.C. law firm and/or its insurance carrier (paragraph 4.2 of Settlement Agreement);o   $981,000 from BT revenues that have been paid to Citibank or into a court escrow since early 2012 (paragraphs 4.1(iv), 4.3, and 4.5 of Settlement Agreement);o   $250,000 of additional payments from BT revenues that will be made to Citibank between now and the closing of this settlement (paragraph 4.1(vi) of Settlement Agreement);o   $500,000 from the City of Burlington’s insurance carrier (paragraph 4.1(v) of Settlement Agreement) ‘ this payment is in addition to the costs of defending the City in the litigation over the past two plus years; ando   An anticipated approximately $1.3 million payment from the City of Burlington (paragraph 4.6 of Settlement Agreement). §  It is anticipated that this payment would be financed in large part by BT revenues. §  This amount could increase and other City funding sources may be required depending on the amount of bridge financing finally negotiated. §  The Settlement Agreement contemplates this contribution being prioritized for repayment to the City at the time a permanent financial partner for BT is found.The settlement contemplates that the terms of the bridge financing will give the City an appropriate period of time to find the right partner for BT.  At the time of an eventual transaction, it is anticipated that the City will receive a percentage of any net proceeds, additional funds available after repayment of the lender’s principal and costs and Burlington’s new $1.3 million participation.  These future net proceeds of the City will be split evenly with Citibank and will provide the opportunity for partial repayment of the $16.9 million previously expended. The City of Burlington and Citibank also agreed to a number of important milestones that the City must meet to complete the Settlement Agreement (paragraph 5 of the Settlement Agreement).  Those milestones include:·         City Council approval of the settlement no later than February 28, 2014;·         Continuing monthly payments from BT revenues to Citibank until agreement is completed;·         Securing a special situation lender to finance up to $6 million of the settlement ‘ this financing will be secured only with BT revenues and assets; and·         Public Service Board approval, for which the City will file no later than March 15, 2014.  ‘The City of Burlington owes a great debt to the citizen members of the former Blue Ribbon Committee who recommended in 2010 the wise course of action that led to this moment,’ added Mayor Weinberger.  ‘I also want to thank Terry Dorman of Dorman & Fawcett ‘ this agreement simply would not have been possible without his firm’s skillful work to stabilize BT’s finances and operations and to secure a bridge lender.  It would not be possible to make today’s announcement without the willingness of Citibank to pursue in the coming months the path forward laid out in the agreement.’ Mayor Weinberger was joined at today’s announcement by both citizen and City Council members of the Burlington Telecom Advisory Board (BTAB), created from what was formerly known as the BT Blue Ribbon Committee (BRC). City Council President and BTAB member Joan Shannon stated:  ‘Today, the big, dark cloud that has hung over the City of Burlington for four years is breaking up, and the sun is beginning to shine through again.  I cannot thank our negotiating team enough for their hard work to get us to this point.  I also want to thank the Citibank participants for their commitment to the negotiating process and for entering into this agreement with the Burlington team.’ City Councilor Karen Paul, also a BTAB member, stated:  ‘This settlement represents an outstanding outcome ‘ the best possible outcome ‘ for taxpayers and for Burlingtonians who believe that BT is an important economic and community development asset for the City.  Given the huge risks the City faced in the lawsuit, I could not be more pleased with the terms of this settlement.  I am grateful to Mayor Weinberger for his ability to direct a complicated and very trying negotiation and garner this result for our City.’ City Councilor Vince Brennan, also a BTAB member, stated:  ‘This news will create an opportunity for BT to move forward and seek the true potential it has to offer for the residents of Burlington.  Even as we talk about a dark cloud being lifted, the residents and subscribers’ of BT never gave up.’ David Provost, former member of the BRC, current member of the BTAB, and Senior Vice President of Finance and Administration at Champlain College, added:  ‘This settlement represents the fulfillment of the goals for BT that the Blue Ribbon Committee laid out in 2010.  Stabilization of the operations of BT is in place, and today the future payment obligations have been restructured to position BT to meet the future needs of residences and companies throughout the City of Burlington.’   The settlement was reached following two days of mediated negotiations that took place in Burlington at the law offices of Downs Rachlin Martin (DRM) on January 21 and 22, 2014 and was executed on January 30.  Mayor Weinberger led a City negotiating team that included:  BTAB member Pat Robins, Executive Chairman at SymQuest Group. Inc.; Terry Dorman, Principal at Dorman & Fawcett; City Attorney Eileen Blackwood; attorney Marc Heath of DRM; and attorney Thomas Melloni of Burak, Anderson & Melloni.  Attorney Richard Cassidy of South Burlington served as the federal court-appointed mediator during both the January 2013 and 2014 negotiations. After the agreement was conceptually reached but before it was finalized, the Mayor briefed the Board of Finance and other City Councilors on the agreement in a Board of Finance executive session on January 27.  The Mayor expects to request City Council approval of the agreement in open session no later than February 28 and, if approved by the Council, the City will file its PSB petition no later than March 15.PHOTO: Burlington City Council members Vince Brennan (from left), Karen Paul and Joan Shannon join Mayor Miro Weinberger to announce a settlement between Burlington Telecom and Citibank. Photo by Hilary Niles/VTDiggerSource: City of Burlington 1.3.2014 AGREEMENTlast_img read more

Concept with elements comparable to ‘Power and Light District’ proposed for downtown Overland Park

first_imgThe Overland Park Presbyterian Church sanctuary would be torn down to make way for a four-deck parking structure under plans submitted to the Overland Park Planning Commission.By Roxie HammillAn office, retail and entertainment center that has been compared in concept to Kansas City’s Power and Light district is being proposed for downtown Overland Park.The $48.5 million project would include a five-story office building, a two-story food hall building, parking garage, surface parking and outdoor gathering space at the southwest corner of 80th Street and Marty Street. If approved, it will become a commanding presence in the heart of a downtown of small shops and eateries.A “benchmark” image provided to the city to show the general style proposed for the office building portion of the project.“I don’t want to use the term Power and Light District because this is a little bit more family oriented than that,” said development attorney John Petersen as he reviewed the project for the city council’s finance and economic development committee Wednesday night. But the development would have a similar outdoor gathering area, perhaps with alcohol sales.The project is in its beginning stages and is set to be considered by the city planning commission next month, Petersen said. The finance committee was briefed in order to start the process for a tax increment financing district.The Edison district was conceived by developer Overland Park Real Estate, LLC. Tim Barton, founder of freight brokerage firm Freightquote and Matt Druten, former Freightquote president, are the principals.The project would be on 3.3 acres of land that is now occupied by single-story retail, a city parking lot and a vacant Presbyterian church. The southern end is across from Santa Fe Commons Park, which has been mentioned as a possible new location for the farmers’ market. Petersen said the developer would be open to allowing public parking in the development on weekends, which would help ease parking problems if the market is moved.Altogether, there would be 109,000 square feet of office space and 12,000 square feet of retail.There are several components to the development. The office building with some first-floor retail is farthest east, at the 80th and Marty corner. Just to the west would be a two-story “food hall” with kiosks and an open deck during warm weather. An outdoor gathering area is envisioned for the space between the two buildings. It would be a possible venue for concerts and would also have a large screen for outdoor movie or sports viewing. There would be a 41-space surface parking lot farther west that could also be used for art fairs or additional farmers’ market space, Petersen said.Developers plan a structured parking garage for 329 vehicles at the southern end of the development. Most of that space would be dedicated to the office workers during the week, but Petersen said the off-hours use could help the city deal with tight parking problems on weekends.Parking was a key issue in a discussion Monday about the future of the farmers’ market. A consultant-backed plan to move the market to Santa Fe Commons Park depends on use of that parking.Developers will negotiate for some public financing of the project in the form of tax increment financing, a community improvement sales tax district and bonds to exempt sales tax on materials. No amount has been officially asked on the TIF district, but paperwork filed on it suggested $6 million of the project would be TIF eligible and $2.8 million CID eligible.Discussions on the public financing are still fluid, but the five committee members present voted unanimously to have city staff move begin to work up an agreement with the developers for further consideration. The full council will review the committee’s recommendation Monday, and a public hearing could be scheduled as early as Jan. 22.Council member Dave White noted that the developer is asking for 100 percent of the TIF revenue, which is higher than city policy currently allows. “That’s a non-starter for me,” White said. However committee members voted to continue to explore the idea.“This is probably the single greatest application we’ve had for downtown Overland Park,” said council member Dan Stock. “There’s a lot of opportunity here.”But council member Paul Lyons said he’s already getting negative feedback from people worried about the impact of such a big development. “They’re concerned about how big the building is going to be,” he said. “There is an opinion out there that says maybe we’re doing too much in downtown Overland Park.”A preliminary site plan of the project.last_img read more

With final approvals in hand, developer preparing to raze hotels on Shawnee Mission Parkway for Metcalf Crossing project

first_imgAn overhead view of the project plan for the former Ramada and Knights Inn site.The Metcalf Crossing project that will raze two shuttered hotels at Metcalf Avenue and Shawnee Mission Parkway got its final go-ahead from the city Monday so demolition can begin this year.Register to continuelast_img