Tate’s rooftop PV shines, U.K.’s solar outlook darkens

first_imgTate’s rooftop PV shines, U.K.’s solar outlook darkensIconic London gallery goes solar as it unveils its new rooftop PV system; presentations on uncertain future of U.K. solar industry held during ceremony. October 23, 2015 pv magazine Legal Markets Markets & Policy Share It was a cloudy morning in London, but Tate Modern’s star shined. London’s famous gallery of contemporary art was unveiling its new rooftop PV system, donated to the gallery by Solarcentury, the British solar firm that organized the event, which also included a line-up of presentations addressing the U.K.’s solar future. Tate’s rooftop PV system is located on the building’s turbine hall – which before being converted into an art gallery used to house a power plant . This is the second “celebrity” installation that Solarcentury has completed in London, following the PV system installed at the Blackfriars Bridge right in the heart of the city. Does a gifted solar rooftop make Tate Modern a green establishment, given that it also receives generous sponsorships from BP and other fossil fuel companies? That question was left hanging in the air from a Guardian newspaper journalist who asked specifically if there is a conflict of interests at play. Rather wisely, Tate had decided not to send a representative to the event. A bleak, or simply cloudy, day for U.K. solar?London’s sky is, unsurprisingly, cloudy today. However, Darren Johnson, chair at the London Assembly’s Environment Committee, put it more accurately. “This might be a black day for U.K. solar since the consultation on the amendment of the feed-in tariffs (FITs) ends today,” Johnson said. Johnson laid bare that London lags behind in solar rooftops compared to other parts of the country and that the city needs to develop a certain plan and strategy to boost the industry, similar to the ambitious plans laid out by New York. Johnson’s conclusions were based on a recent report published by London’s Assembly titled “How London’s homes could generate more solar energy.” Other participants also agreed that London grows faster than ever and urgently needs a green infrastructure plan. What a pity the Committee’s recommendations and findings come in a time that the U.K. government appears to have decided to phase solar power out of the country’s energy mix. Volume matters Following the government’s policy decision to remove the Renewable Obligation Certificates (ROCs) for new PV plants, to scrap the grandfathering mechanism for most of the PV project applications lined up in the old ROC process and to utterly change the accreditation and the size of the FIT scheme, the U.K. solar industry is expecting consolidation and radical shake-up. Targeting specifically the proposed FITs, Paul Barwell, president at the U.K. Solar Trade Association, told the event that these are unworkable since they lead to zero percent investment return and consumers will never be able to borrow capital at such low interest rates to complete PV projects. Also worrying are the installation caps the government has suggested, Barwell added. To reduce the cost of solar and transition the industry safely to a zero subsidy future, U.K. solar needs both higher tariffs and caps, Barwell argued. The first will allow rooftop PV to be investable, the second will allow volume, and thus enable PV cost reduction through the supply chain. At the moment, what we hear from many small to medium installers is that they have been forced to inform their employees that should the new FITs apply in January, they might lose their jobs. Solarcentury’s CEO Frans van den Heuvel told the event under the proposed FITs the company will cancel £16 million of projects in the U.K. and will perhaps need to reduce slightly its workforce. Job cuts though will mainly come via other parts of the supply chain, e.g. in sub-contractors that Solarcentury collaborates with. Future U.K. solar business perspective Naturally, the discussion revolved around the business perspectives for U.K.’s solar sector. The future business perspectives for solar, both in the U.K. and abroad, will need to be developed around the independent power producer (IPP) model, argued Ben Warren, head of energy and environmental finance at Ernst and Young’s U.K. energy team. Businesses all over the world start to generate or purchase electricity directly on their own. This is a trend that cannot be reversed by any regulator because the technology allows it. Asked by pv magazine, Warren said net metering is also a viable solution for the U.K. The British energy regulator should allow it. And even if net-metering does not provide the remuneration sums that FITs did in the past, it will transmit long-term certainty that customers will value, Warren added. Five years ago, a 1 MW PV system cost £5 million. Today it costs £700,000, Warren reminded attendees – food for thought for all involved as the morning ticked by, and London’s dense canopy of grey cloud dispersed, just a little bit.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved imp… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The s… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is a… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Orig… iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine…Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. 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You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Insight @ Energy Storage North America 2020 11 November 2020 pv-magazine.com Developed and moderated by pv magazine, the panel sessions address a hot topic within the industry, from multiple angles. Household solutions for maximizing self-consumption using smart contro… , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRobert van Keulen, Technical Manager, GrowattGautham Ram, Assistant Professor and Researcher, D… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com New for this year, the program will be developed and moderated by Eric Wesoff the new editorial leader of the U.S. platform. 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Take the Equine Code of Practice Survey

first_imgThe welfare of farmed animals is receiving increased attention and changes are happening. In Canada, we have an opportunity to demonstrate that sound animal care standards are in place. More from Horse Sport:Christilot Boylen Retires From Team SportAfter an exemplary career as one of Canada’s top Dressage riders, seven-time Olympian Christilot Boylen has announced her retirement from team competition.2020 Royal Agricultural Winter Fair CancelledFor only the second time in its history, The Royal Agricultural Winter Fair has been cancelled but plans are being made for some virtual competitions.Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Statement on 2020 EventAs the Province of Ontario starts to reopen, The Royal’s Board and staff will adhere to all recommendations put forward by government and health officials.Government Financial Assistance for Ontario FarmersOntario Equestrian has recently released this update of several financial assistance packages available, including those for farm business. Email* A key factor for successfully renewing the Codes of Practice is achieving buy-in, particularly from industry as they are expected to follow the Code. This is done through• having industry initiate the development of their Code,• ensuring that Code Development Committee members bring a broad range of expertise and industry knowledge, and• providing opportunities for all stakeholders to provide input.This confidential survey is one tool that will help ensure we get full participation from all stakeholders. You are an important part of this process and your input is critical to updating the Equine Code of Practice. Your privacy will be protected.  You will have the option to receive updates on the equine code development process, if you wish. The National Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC) is conducting a survey to gain stakeholder insights on the Codes of Practice and views on the care and handling of equine. Your participation is important. To complete this 10 minute survey, go to www.nfacc.ca/codes-of-practice/equine and click on survey. Codes of Practice renewal project*NFACC is engaging in a multi-year project to renew the Codes of Practice for several farm animal species, including equine. Each species has a lead organization responsible for facilitating their individual Code’s development.  For equine, it is Equine Canada. More information on the Code development process and progress on the various Codes under development are available from NFACC’s website http://www.nfacc.ca/. center_img Subscribe to the Horse Sport newsletter and get an exclusive bonus digital edition! Horse Sport Enews We’ll send you our regular newsletter and include you in our monthly giveaways. PLUS, you’ll receive our exclusive Rider Fitness digital edition with 15 exercises for more effective riding. SIGN UP * Funding for the Codes of Practice is provided by Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada’s Agricultural Flexibility Fund (Addressing Domestic and International Market Expectations Relative to Farm Animal Welfare).last_img read more

83-year-old beats COVID-19 after 75 days in hospital

first_imgEsther Silva(HOMESTEAD, Fla.) — BY: TOMMY BROOKSBANKAn 83-year-old Florida man is now home after battling COVID-19 at a hospital for 75 days.Lorenzo Rodriguez tested positive for novel coronavirus back in March after coming down with a fever. Three days later, he was rushed to a Baptist Health South Florida hospital once his conditioned worsened. Doctors immediately put Rodriguez under a medically induced coma and used a ventilator to support his failing lungs.The situation seemed grim, but Esther Silva knew her dad was a fighter.“I had faith that he was going to pull through,” Silva explained. “He’s such a hard worker, I knew he wouldn’t give in.”Days turned into weeks without much progress, until Silva asked medical staff about a plasma treatment for COVID-19 she heard about on TV. Rodriguez received the experimental therapy April 18, and shortly thereafter, a medical breakthrough.“That night I was told my father moved his arm and his eyes — it was incredible,” Silva said. “God answered my prayers.”Rodriguez slowly regained his strength over the course of several weeks, with plenty of ups and downs along the way. After overcoming kidney problems, blood pressure spikes and pneumonia complications, the father and husband eventually was taken off a ventilator. He couldn’t swallow food or water for a time after enduring weeks of receiving meals via feeding tube.Through it all, his determination never wavered.“I kept telling him he had to put in 150% for his part,” Silva said. “Would keep reminding him to continue fighting, and that’s what he did.”After 75 days battling COVID-19, Rodriguez tested negative and was discharged from the Homestead, Florida, hospital as medical staff gathered for a round of applause and cheers. It’s a moment the father-daughter duo will never forget.“I was overwhelmed as soon as I saw him, what can I tell you,” Silva said through tears. “I’m an only child, so my dad is my hero and he was so happy. I would have moved mountains to keep him alive and it was the most incredible feeling to see him after everything he went through.”Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Eleven hurt in double-decker bus crash

first_imgTwo people suffered life-threatening injuries and nine others were hurt when a double-decker bus crashed into a hedge.The driver and 18 passengers were on the Stagecoach bus when it crashed at Oakley, near Basingstoke, Hampshire, at about 1200hrs.Three people have been seriously hurt and the others suffered minor injuries.No other vehicles were involved in the crash. The two most seriously injured people have been taken to the major trauma centre at University Hospital Southampton, South Central Ambulance Service (SCAS) said.Three unaccompanied children were not hurt.Bus operator Stagecoach said it believed the bus “remained upright at all times but that a number of people have been injured, including our driver”.”Safety is our absolute priority and we will assist the police fully in their investigation into the circumstances around this incident.”last_img read more

Elliott tops final practice, scrapes wall at Auto Club

first_imgWATCH: Harvick hits the wall in practice A more significant impact for David Ragan’s No. 38 Ford into the outside retaining wall brought the session to a close with less than two minutes of practice remaining. His Front Row Motorsports team will opt for a reserve car for the balance of the race weekend.WATCH: Ragan hits wall, will go to backup”We just cut a left-rear tire going down the back straightaway and I tried to start slowing it down as quick as I could, and just couldn’t slow it down fast enough,” Ragan said. “By the time I got to Turn 3, I was wrecking before I even got to the corner. It’s certainly unfortunate. I felt like our Camping World Ford was pretty decent. We made a few adjustments and hadn’t put new tires on yet, and I felt like our speeds hadn’t fallen off a lot, so it’s unfortunate. Hopefully, we can get our backup out in time to make a few laps in the second practice.” “We’re just missing it a little bit. There’s just something that we can’t get right on (corner) entry this weekend and we’ve been trying to work on that, and it’s kind of messing up the rest of the corner for us.” “No, I think I was above the seam by the time the car got loose,” Busch told FS1. “It over-rotated on me. I tried getting in the throttle and getting it to rotate a little bit and it just kept going too far. Spun it out on exit there, and unfortunately just didn’t keep all the air in the tires in order to be able to drive it back and not damage the car a little bit more than we already did. Not too bad. “I thought it was decent, so I was pleased with that. Unfortunately, this now puts us behind and we’ll have to go to work and hopefully try to get it tuned back up. It’s hurt pretty good.” Erik Jones topped Saturday’s opening practice session at Auto Club Speedway ahead of Sunday’s Auto Club 400 (3:30 p.m. ET, FOX, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio), the fifth race of the 2017 Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series season. Chase Elliott posted the fastest lap in Saturday’s final Monster Energy NASCAR Cup Series practice, but a scrape with the outside retaining wall early in the session left his Hendrick Motorsports No. 24 Chevrolet team with work to do. Martin Truex Jr. posted the second-fastest lap (187.378 mph) in the Furniture Row Racing No. 78 Toyota. Ryan Blaney was third-fastest in the Wood Brothers’ No. 21 Ford, with Sunoco Rookie of the Year candidate Erik Jones — Truex’s Furniture Row teammate — fourth-best in the No. 77 Toyota. Jones posted a lap of 187.251 mph in the Furniture Row Racing No. 77 Toyota to pace the 55-minute session. He was also fastest in the category of consecutive 10-lap averages. The Sunoco Rookie of the Year candidate will start 14th in Sunday’s 400-miler, the last of three races in the NASCAR Goes West swing. Five teams were held out of the opening 15 minutes of practice because of technical violations Friday. Trevor Bayne’s team was docked for failing on two passes through the Laser Inspection Station (LIS). The cars of Joey Logano, Gray Gaulding and Matt DiBenedetto failed LIS on their second pass through. The No 38 Ford of David Ragan was penalized for an improper seal for transmission or gears. Kyle Busch, a three-time Auto Club winner, was involved in a solo spin at the 34-minute mark of the 50-minute session, avoiding contact with the wall or other cars. He limped his Joe Gibbs Racing No. 18 Toyota back to the garage. Ricky Stenhouse Jr.’s Roush Fenway Racing No. 17 Ford and Kurt Busch’s Stewart-Haas Racing No. 41 Ford were also among several cars to brush the wall during Saturday’s final tune-up. Erik Jones fast in Saturday’s early session The practice was marked by two incidents late in the session. Kevin Harvick scraped the right side of his Stewart-Haas Racing No. 4 Ford on the Turn 4 wall with just over 10 minutes left in the session. Harvick managed the sixth-fastest speed in the 14 laps he turned before the incident. BUY TICKETS: Celebrate Auto Club’s 20th anniversary RELATED: Final practice results | Practice 2 results | Best 10-lap averagescenter_img WATCH: Busch’s smoky slide in practice The 21-year-old driver indicated that his crew was working to hopefully avoid going to a reserve car. Elliott is scheduled to start 13th in Sunday’s 400-miler. Jimmie Johnson, who damaged his primary car in Friday’s opening practice, turned his first laps with his reserve Hendrick Motorsports No. 48 Chevrolet on Saturday morning. He was fourth-fastest at 186.384 mph. Brad Keselowski rounded out the top five in the first practice of the day. Elliott posted his best speed at 187.480 mph before making contact with the wall just 10 minutes into the final session. He cited a parts failure on the left-front corner of the car that his crew was investigating ahead of Sunday’s Auto Club 400 (3:30 p.m. ET, FOX, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio). Pole sitter Kyle Larson, who also topped Friday’s lone practice, placed 22nd on the board in the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet. “We’re going to try to fix this one,” Elliott told FS1. “I mean, we’d love to keep our primary. … We would love to keep this car. I don’t know if we can or not, but like I said, it definitely puts us in a hole. I know they’ll work hard and try to get it tuned up as best we can for tomorrow.” RELATED: Johnson passes on qualifying after practice wreck “We don’t really know why it did,” Elliott told FS1. “It was nothing fancy or anything we were doing, it’s just something that needs to be together to go. We’ll look into why. I don’t know if it’s just the roughness of the race track that bounced it loose or something like that, but I hate it. I was really happy with the NAPA Chevy throughout that run. I thought we were close, maybe needed a tick more initially in a run. </p> RELATED: Consecutive 10-lap average speeds Chase Elliott registered the second-fastest lap, ringing up 186.843 mph on the speed chart in the Hendrick Motorsports No. 24 Chevrolet. Ryan Newman, last week’s winner at Phoenix Raceway, was third-fastest in the Richard Childress Racing No. 31 Chevrolet.  Coors Light Pole Award winner Kyle Larson was fifth-fastest in the Chip Ganassi Racing No. 42 Chevrolet. He drove away from a slight brush with the wall shortly after Elliott’s incident. Kevin Harvick, who made contact with the wall in Saturday’s earlier practice, returned for the final session and posted the eighth-best lap (185.706 mph) in the Stewart-Haas Racing No. 4 Ford.last_img read more

Phoenix Monster Energy Series pit stall assignments

first_imgSee where your favorite driver will pit in Sunday’s TicketGuardian 500 at ISM Raceway (3:30 p.m. ET on FOX, MRN, SiriusXM NASCAR Radio).last_img

Todd Gilliland looking for one crucial victory over next three races

first_imgThe math isn’t adding up for Todd Gilliland, but a victory in one of the next three races could transform the equation dramatically.The driver of the No. 4 Kyle Busch Motorsports Toyota is eighth in the NASCAR Gander Outdoors Truck Series standings, but five other competitors, including two behind him (Tyler Ankrum and Ross Chastain) already have locked up playoff spots with victories.Given that Gilliland is 150 points out of first place and 100 behind Matt Crafton (currently in the last playoff-eligible position on points), his only realistic path to the postseason lies in winning a race.RELATED: Truck Series standings | Pocono scheduleTo do that, Gilliland will have to translate early speed into a checkered flag. He has three chances — in Saturday’s Gander RV 150 at Pocono Raceway (1 p.m. ET on FOX, MRN and SiriusXM NASCAR Radio), or in subsequent races at Eldora and Michigan.Last year, Gilliland qualified second in consecutive races at those three tracks, but his best finish among the three was fifth at Michigan. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t think he can win before the end of the regular season — even, perhaps, on dirt at Eldora.“Someone’s got to win there, so it can be me,” said Gilliland, who was second fastest behind KBM teammate Harrison Burton opening practice and quickest in Happy Hour. “We were fast at Michigan. We’ve got a fast truck this weekend. It just doesn’t drive real good.“We’ve been working really hard, and, honestly, this weekend coming here … Kyle Busch Motorsports, I think I saw on Instagram, has won the last four races here. So we’ve got a pretty good track record. We’re still trying to be that guy who brings it home this weekend.“But with a bunch of young teammates, it makes it hard, because you don’t really know what to go off of. We trust each other as much as we can. At the same time, we’ve got to have our own feel for it and go forward with confidence.”Teammates Burton and Christian Eckes are both 18 years old. Gilliland turned 19 in May.last_img read more

Student Proves We Can Grow Millions of Pounds of Food By Planting it on Top of Trash

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreThis student’s plan to tackle food insecurity may sound unappetizing, but it’s actually pretty ingenious.Joy Youwakim, an economics student at the University of Texas, has proven that we can safely grow produce on top of inactive landfills. Using a 200-foot patch of land in a closed landfill southeast of Austin, Youwakim worked with her fellow students to grow 20 pounds of various crops, such as radishes, eggplant, bell peppers, cucumbers, and cantaloupe. All of the produce was then tested and declared safe by the Food Safety Net Services.If Youwakim expanded her efforts to include all 390 acres of the landfill, she would be able to grow enough food for over 8,000 families. There were more than 6,000 inactive landfills in 2012, which roughly amounts to over 2 million acres of unused land. If implemented nationwide, Youwakim’s experiment could spell the end for food insecurity.CHECK OUT: Instead of Arguing Online, Political Foes Are Coming Together Over Food to ‘Make America Dinner Again’The economics student says that she first got the idea for her initiative when she saw what an unused landfill actually looked like.“I was working at the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality one summer and struck up a conversation with an employee working in the landfill division,” she told the Good News Network. “When he showed me a picture of a closed landfill, I was so surprised to find that it looked more like a closed golf course than a pile of trash.“I’ve always been passionate about food access, so I immediately began thinking about the possibilities of growing food on this space. I learned that landfills are typically located in low income areas, so I saw this as an opportunity to bring fresh produce to individuals living in food deserts as well as a way to sustain farmable land as our population grows and we continue to urbanize.”LOOK: Cheap ‘Plant Pods’ That Can Grow More Lettuce in a Room Than Half-Acre Plot May End HungerAfter that, Youwakim says it took about 13 months of phone calls, proposals, and cutting through red tape to get the necessary food permits to conduct her experiment.Now, she has been nominated as one of four finalists for the General Mills Feeding Better Futures Scholars Program for a chance to win $50,000 to develop their food relief initiatives.Kate Stagliano, who is one of the other competition finalists, has been featured on Good News Network in the past for her incredible story about how a massive cabbage inspired her to start an organization that encourages youngsters to grow their own food for the needy.RELATED: How One Girl Fed Thousands Thanks to an Unusually Large CabbageWhether Youwakim wins or not, she says that she is excited to expand her initiative to other communities, one trash patch at a time.“Landfills are not an endangered resource they’re going to keep being around,” she told GNN. “When these landfills close, I want to use this space and grow food on top of them instead of abandoning them.”(WATCH the video below)Plant Some Positivity And Share The Good News With Your FriendsAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

Jared Grimes Says He Braces for Blair Underwood’s Shirtless Scene in A Soldier’s Play, Too

first_imgJared Grimes(Photos by Emilio Madrid for Broadway.com) View Comments Related Shows Jared Grimes is practically a vaudevillian. He’s a Broadway talent who’s tap danced his way through After Midnight and associate choreographed a musical about Tupac Shakur, Holler If Ya Hear Me. He’s danced alongside stars like Mariah Carey, Ben Vereen and Jerry Lewis. He’s currently showcasing his acting chops by playing Private Tony Smalls in A Soldier’s Play by Charles Fuller on Broadway. The sheer diversity of his resume is no accident, Grimes told Broadway.com’s Paul Wontorek in a recent #LiveAtFive interview. “I’ve always had dreams of being a performer,” said Grimes, who was raised by a mother who ran a dance school. “I had dreams of being like my idols, such as Gregory Hines, Sammy Davis Jr. and Fred Astaire. They did everything. Their resumes and their lives were packed full of different accomplishments across many different genres and mediums.”Grimes doesn’t tap in A Soldier’s Play, but he does sing; there are multiple scenes in the show of the soldiers singing together in their barracks. “It’s like a brotherhood,” said Grimes. The story of a tight-knit group of black soldiers in a segregated army unit during World War II, it’s no surprise that A Soldier’s Play brings its actors together—it certainly did with the the original 1981 off-Broadway cast. To Grimes, the story feels so relevant that, “in a sense, we’re not acting. We’ve been those characters for much of our lives.”  A Soldier’s Play Blair Underwood A young Samuel L. Jackson, Denzel Washington and Peter Friedman populated the play’s original production, leading Fuller’s ahead-of-its-time discussion of internalized racism, self-hatred and racial violence to a Pulitzer Prize in 1982. “It’s fun to step into the shoes of such great actors that performed these roles before us,” Grime said. “It’s an honor to do that alongside my fellow cast mates every night.” This new version also has its shares of stars: Blair Underwood, David Alan Grier and former NFL MVP Nnamdi Asomugha.It’s not all serious, though. According to Grimes, whenever the soldiers take their shirts off during the play, the audience “go extremely crazy,” especially when Underwood does it. “We brace ourselves for that moment every night,” Grimes laughed. “In rehearsals, Blair was like, ‘This is the part where I’m gonna show my abs? [Director] Kenny Leon was like, ‘You guys work out. I know you guys are in the gym. You’re some good-looking brothers. You’re in the army, so you would naturally take off your shirt and show some skin.’”Watch the rest of Grimes’ #LiveAtFive interview below.  Jared Grimes Show Closed This production ended its run on March 15, 2020 Star Files  Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 32:50Loaded: 0%00:00Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently behind liveLIVERemaining Time -32:50 1xPlayback RateChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedEnglishAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.last_img read more

Weekly unemployment claims fall back to mid-winter levels

first_imgVermont Business Magazine The post-winter recreation layoffs appear to be subsiding, if a little earlier than usual, and weekly unemployment claims are back to about where they were in January. Claims fell last week, but are still slightly ahead of numbers from the same time last year, as the disappointing winter tourism season ended sooner due to a historically warm winter. For the week of March 26, 2016, there were 639 claims, down 155 from the previous week’s total and 71 more than they were a year ago. By industry, claims fell evenly across most sectors. Altogether 7,299 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 103 from a week ago, and 154 fewer than a year ago.The Department processed 0 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08).The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)Vermont’s unemployment rate held at 3.4 percent in February, as the labor force and total employment increased, along with a decrease in the number of unemployed. SEE STORY.NOTE: Employment (nonfarm payroll) – A count of all persons who worked full- or part-time or received pay from a nonagricultural employer for any part of the pay period which included the 12th of the month. Because this count comes from a survey of employers, persons who work for two different companies would be counted twice. Therefore, nonfarm payroll employment is really a count of the number of jobs, rather than the number of persons employed. Persons may receive pay from a job if they are temporarily absent due to illness, bad weather, vacation, or labor-management dispute. This count is based on where the jobs are located, regardless of where the workers reside, and is therefore sometimes referred to as employment “by place of work.” Nonfarm payroll employment data are collected and compiled based on the Current Employment Statistics (CES) survey, conducted by the Vermont Department of Labor. This count was formerly referred to as nonagricultural wage and salary employment.last_img read more