first_imgJamaica Scorpions assistant coach Andrew Richardson believes that though largely inexperienced at the moment, the team has what it takes to surprise three-time defending champions Guyana Jaguars in Guyana in the opening round of the Digicel Regional Four-day Championship, beginning on Thursday. Jamaica, who finished fourth last season after leading at the mid-way mark of the 10-round tournament, are without regular captain Nikita Miller, who is out injured, as well as wicketkeeper Chadwick Walton, batsmen John Campbell and AndrÈ McCarthy, and fast bowlers Reynard Leveridge and Oshane Thomas. The big-hitting Walton, recently departed for the Bangladesh Premier League, while Campbell, McCarthy, Leveridge, and Thomas are with the West Indies “A” team, who are currently facing Sri Lanka in a three-match Test series in Trelawny and Kingston. “The squad that has been selected is young but has enough quality to come away with a positive result,” said Richardson, who, along with head coach Robert Samuels and team, departed the country yesterday. “Our batting will be led by our new overseas player West Indies batsman Assad Fudadin, who played key roles for Guyana in their victories over the past three seasons, and include rising players such as Brandon King, Fabian Allen, Paul Palmer, and Trevon Griffiths. “Meanwhile, as it relates to our bowling, we have Jason Dawes, who has represented the West Indies “A” before leading our pace attack, and left-arm wrist spinner Dennis Bulli and off-spinner Damani Sewell, our spin department.” Jamaica Scorpions squad -Trevon Griffith, Garth Garvey, Paul Palmer, Brandon King, Assad Fudadin, Fabian Allen, Dennis Bulli, Damani Sewell, Romaine Morris, Jason Dawes, Keno Wallace, Derval Green, and Paul Harrison.last_img read more

first_imgThe Rev. Keith Pecklers, a Jesuit professor of liturgy at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, said Martino was clearly responding to a social concern: an increase in traffic deaths in places including Italy and Spain because of speeding, as well as an increase in road rage, aggressive driving and driving under the influence of alcohol and drugs in places including the U.S. Pecklers dismissed any suggestion that Martino’s “Ten Commandments” were at all sacrilegious, saying it was “creative pedagogy” that would certainly get people’s attention. He stressed that the rules could never be considered binding in the way the official Ten Commandments are. But for some, the document was at least reason to poke fun at the Vatican. “Overtaking is a sin? Well, then I’m a murderer; I’ll turn myself in immediately,” quipped movie director Dino Risi, whose classic film “Il Sorpasso” – known in the U.S. as “The Easy Life” or “The Overtaking” – ends with a car crash. “I think the Vatican has lost its marbles,” he added, according to the ANSA news agency. There was no indication Pope Benedict XVI had approved of, or even read, the document. It was signed by Martino and his secretary – as is customary for lower-level documents that are routinely put out by the offices of the Vatican’s vast bureaucracy. Martino is known as something of a loose cannon at the Vatican, and occasionally his pronouncements have gotten him into trouble. Motorists shalt not … The Vatican’s commandments for drivers: 1. You shall not kill. 2. The road shall be for you a means of communion between people and not of mortal harm. 3. Courtesy, uprightness and prudence will help you deal with unforeseen events. 4. Be charitable and help your neighbor in need, especially victims of accidents. 5. Cars shall not be for you an expression of power and domination, and an occasion of sin. 6. Charitably convince the young and not so young not to drive when they are not in a fitting condition to do so. 7. Support the families of accident victims. 8. Bring guilty motorists and their victims together, at the appropriate time, so that they can undergo the liberating experience of forgiveness. 9. On the road, protect the more vulnerable party. 10. Feel responsible toward others.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! VATICAN CITY – The Vatican on Tuesday issued a “Ten Commandments” for motorists to keep them on the road to salvation, warning drivers against the sins of road rage, abuse of alcohol or even simple rudeness. The unusual document from the Vatican’s office for migrants and itinerant people also warned that automobiles can be “an occasion of sin” – particularly when used to make a dangerous passing maneuver or when used by prostitutes and their clients. And it suggested prayer might come in handy – performing the sign of the cross before starting off and saying the rosary along the way. The rosary is well-suited to recitation by all in the car, it said, since its “rhythm and gentle repetition does not distract the driver’s attention.” Cardinal Renato Martino, who heads the office, told a news conference the Vatican felt it necessary to address the pastoral needs of motorists because driving has become such a big part of contemporary life. He cited World Health Organization estimates that 1.2 million people are killed and as many as 50 million are injured in road crashes each year. “That’s a sad reality, and at the same time, a great challenge for society and the church,” he said. He noted that the Bible was full of people on the move, including Mary and Joseph, the parents of Jesus – and that his office is tasked with dealing with all “itinerant” people on the roads: from refugees to prostitutes, from truck drivers to the homeless. The document, “Guidelines for the Pastoral Care of the Road,” extols the benefits of driving – family outings, getting the sick to the hospital, allowing people to get to work and seeing other cultures. But it laments a host of ills associated with automobiles: Drivers use their cars to show off; driving “provides an easy opportunity to dominate others” by speeding; and drivers can kill themselves and others if they drink, use drugs or fall asleep at the wheel. last_img read more