first_imgDear Editor,Permit me to thank Mike Persaud for his attention, as he seems to have gone to great lengths to formulate a rather curious response to a letter I previously penned; to questions I didn’t even ask. Persaud states: “Had one of the leaders in Guyana not been a self-proclaimed communist, there would have been no US intervention here.” It is distasteful for anyone, much less a Guyanese, to justify international political bullyism exerted by the West on developing countries, especially those which were already raped by colonial empires, as was Guyana.The Guyanese people who fought for the independence of this country, supported by a smashing majority the Peoples Progressive Party/Civic, even after Burnham decamped, widening the gaps of ethnic fissures as he went. It means therefore, that the people chose Jagan and whatever political ideology he brought with him over Burnham’s, resulting in the party securing the most votes in 1964. Additionally, Jagan’s policies in office, and the thriving economy which resulted thereof, proved him to be all but a communist. Now since Mike Persaud is a fan of “what ifs” and “should haves”, he should imagine what Guyana would have been like had Jagan not suffered the spite of the US.“Dictatorial oppression and ethnic cleavages were the legacies of the intervention. We should not carp over these things, and continue to be embittered by what the United States did. We should just accept it as realpolitik and move forward,” writes Persaud. These are not legacies, but rather a curse which has served no other purpose than to weaken our national sovereignty and impermeability to foreign interference, typical of US foreign policy in Latin America, the Middle East and Africa. This laissez-faire attitude adopted in particular by those who attempt to negate the PNC’s responsibilities in our political turmoil, is counterproductive to the formation of a national identity.The remainder of Persaud’s letter is an insult to Guyanese who value our independence and should not even be tolerated in a national daily. The man proposes that “Guyana consider and debate the idea of becoming an overseas state of the United States” so that “every able-bodied adult would have one-and-a-half jobs and the ethnic cleavage problem would disappear as it did in Singapore.” Thankfully, we the Guyanese people are a free nation because we fought for equal and civil rights; for our right to self-determination and liberation from men who considered themselves superior to us.The social dilemma of the people living in the French Antilles and the economic disparities which benefit the Békés – descendants of colonists – is a perfect example of why we fought for our independence back then.Lastly, the US is far from being a socially just and tolerant society. Black Americans are still fighting discrimination in America, Native Americans still live in depravation on State imposed reserves, Latinos are still stigmatised and State sponsored Islamophobia has diabolised Arab immigrants. It is hardly likely that a country which in 240 years, has been unable to resolve its own issues, would resolve ours.Aldous Huxley said, “Men do not learn much from the lessons of history, and that is the most important lesson of history.” I fear that this is quite applicable to the case of Mr Persaud.Sincerely,Anna Correialast_img read more

first_imgChick said she will take some time to talk with others about her plans and whether to pursue it further. Chick is the second high-profile official to take advantage of voters’ approval of a measure that gives City Council members the opportunity to serve a third four-year term in office. Assemblyman Richard Alarcon, D-Van Nuys, is running to fill out the two years left in the term of former Councilman Alex Padilla. Alarcon said it is the prospect of being able to serve another full term on the council that convinced him to run for the job. Weiss has said in interviews that he plans to run for the city attorney post that Rocky Delgadillo will have to give up in 2009. Delgadillo has not announced his plans, although there have been reports he is interested in running for Chick’s office. If Chick does run for Weiss’ council seat, she would have to move from her Silver Lake home to establish residency in the district. Councilman Dennis Zine, who now holds the 3rd District seat Chick previously had representing the West San Fernando Valley, said he would support Chick if she decides to run. “She did extremely well when she was on the council and has done extremely well as controller,” Zine said. “She is very much attuned to the public and made a mark when she served on the council. “I can see why she’d want to take advantage of this opportunity. If you have the desire to serve the public in this arena of politics on the local level, there aren’t that many opportunities like this out there.” rick.orlov@dailynews.com (213) 978-0390160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Facing term limits in two years, City Controller Laura Chick announced Friday she wants to return to the City Council – although not the San Fernando Valley seat she held for eight years. Chick, popular for her audits exposing misdeeds and mismanagement, said she is eyeing the 5th District seat expected to be vacated by Councilman Jack Weiss in 2009. “I have been gratified and encouraged by the countless individuals who have urged me to continue my work in public service by running for a third term on the City Council in 2009,” Chick said in a statement. “I love serving the people of Los Angeles as city controller. My two terms have given me a fresh perspective on the many serious issues and problems that we face as a city.” last_img read more

first_imgBeth Les, who was one of the boarders evicted, called the experience “heart breaking.” What’s worse, she said, is that she hasn’t seen any progress or change to the property since they moved away. Mike Popovec, a member of the Rowland Heights Coordinating Council, said he will be disappointed if the land does not remain as it is. “Residents purchased their properties with the idea they would be looking at open space,” Popovec said. “Up until this point, we have been successful in convincing the county that reversing open space is not a good trend to set.” The land was designated as open space, which allows for passive recreation, in 1984. But Councilman Wen Chang said nothing has been decided. jennifer.mclain@sgvn.com (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2477160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! DIAMOND BAR – Ken Gates lived on an undeveloped parcel in unincorporated Los Angeles County for almost 20 years. He called it the Circle G Ranch. There, he provided a home for more than 100 horses. But a year ago, he received an eviction notice from property owner Robert Reed that forced Gates and the horses to find new homes. “We had a very nice family going,” said Rowland Heights resident Susan Shaver, who housed a horse at the ranch. “Since then, I know others have sold horses, moved great distances and have basically scattered to the winds.” The Circle G Ranch was located on 150 acres of open space. An application for a 43-home development on Hastings Street in Rowland Heights drew attention to the ranch, which was operating without a permit. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWhicker: John Jackson greets a Christmas that he wasn’t sure he’d seeDespite the opposition from the boarders and nearby residents, everyone was moved out of the ranch by April. Just three months later, Reed and the city of Diamond Bar struck up a land deal. Diamond Bar approved a $64,000 down payment in July for the Robert Reed Family Trust property, 150 acres located located west of the Orange (57) Freeway near Pathfinder Road in Rowland Heights, an unincorporated part of Los Angeles County. The city agreed to pay $3.2 million for 150 acres of land owned by a family trust once escrow closes. City officials said they are not sure what the land will be used for, but a golf course and preserving it as open and other recreational spaces are possibilities. last_img read more