first_imgJamaica Scorpions assistant coach Andrew Richardson believes that though largely inexperienced at the moment, the team has what it takes to surprise three-time defending champions Guyana Jaguars in Guyana in the opening round of the Digicel Regional Four-day Championship, beginning on Thursday. Jamaica, who finished fourth last season after leading at the mid-way mark of the 10-round tournament, are without regular captain Nikita Miller, who is out injured, as well as wicketkeeper Chadwick Walton, batsmen John Campbell and AndrÈ McCarthy, and fast bowlers Reynard Leveridge and Oshane Thomas. The big-hitting Walton, recently departed for the Bangladesh Premier League, while Campbell, McCarthy, Leveridge, and Thomas are with the West Indies “A” team, who are currently facing Sri Lanka in a three-match Test series in Trelawny and Kingston. “The squad that has been selected is young but has enough quality to come away with a positive result,” said Richardson, who, along with head coach Robert Samuels and team, departed the country yesterday. “Our batting will be led by our new overseas player West Indies batsman Assad Fudadin, who played key roles for Guyana in their victories over the past three seasons, and include rising players such as Brandon King, Fabian Allen, Paul Palmer, and Trevon Griffiths. “Meanwhile, as it relates to our bowling, we have Jason Dawes, who has represented the West Indies “A” before leading our pace attack, and left-arm wrist spinner Dennis Bulli and off-spinner Damani Sewell, our spin department.” Jamaica Scorpions squad -Trevon Griffith, Garth Garvey, Paul Palmer, Brandon King, Assad Fudadin, Fabian Allen, Dennis Bulli, Damani Sewell, Romaine Morris, Jason Dawes, Keno Wallace, Derval Green, and Paul Harrison.last_img read more

first_imgEnvy has been defined as the desire for that which is not yours and the begrudging of the individual who really possesses it.And the object of the coveted possession may not be merely material possessions, but could cover a wide-ranging cornucopia of desirability, ie, good looks, a job, academic achievements, social popularity, ability to overcome difficult circumstances and advance despite inhibiting constraints, among a plethora of others.The twin sins of envy and covetousness have destroyed many relationships and laid waste to lives and the quality of lives of those victimised because of the greed, envy, and covetousness of others.According to philosopher and student of human behaviour Lansing, “covetousness is the desire of that which is not yours and is presently unattainable as it belongs to someone else or lies outside of your ability to get.” But he should have clarified “… to get except by nefarious or criminal means”.Commenting on the negative emotion of jealousy, Lansing posits: “People get envious in a relationship once they really feel that someone else is trying to destroy, steal, or take over that romantic relationship. A lady will get jealous when she thinks her guy is spending as well much time with or around an additional woman. A man will get jealous when he sees an additional guy flirting with his girlfriend or wife.”Victims of those who are covetous, envious and/or jealous often revert to defensive emotion that seeks to protect the victimised individual from the actions of those who do not choose to suppress their negative emotional traits. Some become depressed and withdraw into themselves, while others react in multiple other ways, sometimes even leading to violence.In the Biblical Book of Proverbs, jealousy is deemed as ‘the rage of a man’. Those who possess the negative emotional traits of envy, jealousy, and covetousness are often irrational and, most times, act with vindictiveness and spitefulness toward their victims.The psychological attachment to things coveted and the envy of the possessor by the covetous can have dire consequences and afflict the object of desire, as well as dependants; such as the instance of a spurned lover burning down the house of a woman, who is cremated alive with her children. Thus, these emotions can become lethal if acted upon.A blog on the website of the popular Greg Gardner posits: “Covetousness will be the emotional desire for and attachment to something that isn’t yours and is presently unattainable. The Bible clearly forbids us to covet our neighbour’s wife. Once we allow a psychological attachment and desire for someone which has reserved himself or herself to another person, we’re strolling on a very treacherous floor.“You can say that it’s covetousness that produces envy. When a partner starts to covet an existence outside of his relationship, he is certain to provoke his spouse to jealousy. When a lady starts to covet a man currently married, she will provoke that man’s spouse to jealousy.“Covetousness is a signal of discontent. If you are beginning to appear outside your marriage for a happy existence, plainly, you have to get assistance with your relationship. This discontent often provokes other people to jealousy, which only compounds the problem.”Discontent with one’s lot could be a precipitator for striving for enhancement of one’s life and lifestyle, or it could induce one to harm the object of their desire; or to wrest the coveted article by violent or criminal means.Rancorous feelings toward someone emanating from envy and/or jealousy of that person, or greed and covetousness for the possessions of someone else, can lead to situations of conflict that could very well be avoided if one tries to be content with his/her lot and endeavour for their own upward mobility through their own efforts.Envy, greed, jealousy, covetousness are bitter fruits of discontent that could poison one’s entire life and inhibit one’s capacity for enjoyment of life and the zeal to achieve to one’s optimum potential for personal growth and development. Even worse, the innocent victims of their desires are the collateral damage of their egomania and psychoses.last_img read more

first_img0Shares0000RIO DE JANEIRO, June 29- Uruguay coach Oscar Tabarez likened James Rodriguez to Diego Maradona after his sublime volley inspired Colombia to a 2-0 victory in the World Cup last 16 on Saturday.“For me, special talents are those who do things that are completely out of the ordinary,” said Tabarez, whose side were beaten by two Rodriguez goals at the Maracana stadium. “Diego Maradona, Lionel Messi, Luis Suarez, James Rodriguez — they do things because they have certain gifts that make them special.”Rodriguez, 22, opened the scoring in the 28th minute with a sensational goal, chesting the ball down and hammering a volley in off the crossbar from 25 yards.He doubled his tally early in the second half, sweeping home Juan Cuadrado’s knock-down to move to the top of the Golden Boot standings with five goals.“I believe he’s the best player at the World Cup,” Tabarez added. “I don’t think I’m exaggerating. He’s a young player. We tried to limit his influence, but he kept going and made his presence felt.“Hopefully he’ll continue to progress, because he’s very young. Football needs players with these characteristics.”Colombia’s victory means that they will face hosts Brazil in the quarter-finals in Fortaleza on July 4.Colombia coach Jose Pekerman, who led an Argentina side containing Messi to the quarter-finals in 2006, said that Rodriguez was a player with rare and unusual gifts.“In my long experience in football, I’ve had extraordinary footballer players in my teams, elite players of a very high technical level,” said the Argentine.“I placed James in the centre of everything, because I saw the extraordinary ability that he had.“What’s most surprising is that at his young age, he doesn’t have any problem taking responsibility for doing things that some footballers take many years to understand.“He’s a technical player who has everything to be a top player at a world level, both in terms of helping his team-mates to play and in taking the time to evaluate situations to see what needs to be done as a team.“I have great praise for what he’s doing. I never had any doubts that this would be his World Cup.”Rodriguez, who joined Monaco from Porto last year in a 45-million-euro ($61 million) deal, said that he was delighted to have helped guide Colombia to the World Cup quarter-finals for the first time.“We’re very happy, because we’re making history,” he said.“When I was younger, I always wanted to be here. It was a big dream of mine, and we hope we can make it bigger. This is a team that really wants to win.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

first_imgMayor Antonio Villaraigosa failed to win cooperation, lost in court and now has one shot left to take over some of L.A.’s lowest-performing schools – by winning control of the school board. But having sparked an intense public debate about the successes and failures of Los Angeles Unified, Villaraigosa finds that his own plan is just one of the various subplots unfolding for reform of the 710,000-student district. Successful charter operator Steve Barr has submitted a proposal to new Superintendent David Brewer III, seeking to transform the beleaguered Locke, Dorsey and Crenshaw high schools, as well as their feeder middle schools, with the tenets of his Green Dot Public Schools. The questionable future of the mayor’s legislation for a partial takeover and his plans to back candidates in the expensive March school board election have opened the door for various interests to push their own ideas for reform. And that has set the stage for the school board – facing changes in its membership – to look at new options, especially with Brewer working far more closely with Villaraigosa than retired Superintendent Roy Romer ever did. “It’s a golden opportunity for people like Steve Barr and others to get a piece of the action,” said Jaime Regalado, director of the Edmund G. “Pat” Brown Institute of Public Affairs at California State University, Los Angeles. “It’s logical that the mayor did open the lid to the Pandora’s box on a very troubled school district, and a lot of potential and real reformers were waiting to see what would happen. It opens other fronts of potential reform dialogue. “The school board is going to give because they realize they’re going to lose some of their control, and I think they’ve already lost it.” Brewer said Barr is one of several people who have approached him with reform plans. He plans to evaluate each proposal for practicality and maturity, and he then will decide whether any will be implemented at the district’s 800 schools. He would not divulge details of the other proposals. But the retired Navy admiral promised to launch “innovative and bold” plans in the next two to three months. “The changes proposed will be very bold. We have a lot of ideas of our own,” Brewer said. “I am a transformer, not a reformer. “Part of the bold change will be transforming within LAUSD so we can execute and scale.” Deputy Mayor Ray Cortines, himself a former superintendent of LAUSD and other districts, said the mayor’s team would welcome the opportunity to oversee a cluster of schools if offered. That would allow them to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing the 52 initiatives included in their “Schoolhouse” reform blueprint. “I want LAUSD to be a viable choice. … Why do we need another 15percent of our young people and parents leaving the public school system to go to a charter school because they want a quality education? “If we had charge of a cluster or if we had charge of a group of elementaries, or all of the elementaries, next year, there would be no social promotion.” Barr’s proposal includes focusing on Dorsey, Locke and Crenshaw high schools and their feeder schools, which are in dire need of intervention. The total number of schools that would fall under the proposal would have to be negotiated, Barr said. Locke’s freshman classes have had about 1,400 students in past years, but they graduate just 350 seniors, Barr said. Accounting for families moving out of the neighborhood, the dropout figures are still disturbing. What Barr proposed to do is incubate small, autonomous kindergarten-through-ninth-grade schools, where students would be brought up to grade level in reading and math. Each incubator school would have its own autonomous budget, principal, staff and uniforms. In the meantime, 10th- to 12th-graders would receive significant intervention. Within four years, Barr said, the entire school would be broken into six or so smaller campuses. Another component of the proposal is to create same-sex academies for boys and girls. At Jefferson High, another troubled campus in downtown Los Angeles, Barr came close to achieving a collaboration with LAUSD administrators. “(But) when push came to shove, there wasn’t complete buy-in. It’s got to be everybody pulling,” he said. What followed was a massive parental revolt, resulting in their demand for Green Dot to take over and to break the large campus into smaller schools. Barr said he hopes to partner with the district, but if he encounters resistance – as he did with Romer – he will mobilize the community to ensure their demands for change are heard. And his default strategy would be to create charter schools nearby that would compete with Dorsey, Locke and Crenshaw and their feeder schools. “When we look at an area, we figure out if there is space for collaboration with the district,” he said. “At the same time, our involvement in that area is not going to be determined by if they want to have a collaboration. We’re going to do something in that area. “We’re building coalitions, but I would prefer collaboration with the district or the mayor to change the system and improve educational choices for the kids.” Barr, who has 12 charters pending within LAUSD, has been planning to penetrate predominantly African-American neighborhoods, since eight of Green Dot’s 10 schools are almost entirely Latino. Crenshaw and Dorsey are among the last of the prominent African-American populated schools, where more than half the students are black. Locke’s enrollment is about 40percent African-American, but it’s a much bigger school, serving more African-American families than the first two schools combined. But Barr said a majority of blacks in the community are fleeing Los Angeles, dropping out, or sending their children to other suburban public schools or to private schools. “Our theory of change is the district will never get better until we get African-American and white families to move back in the district.” So far, both Barr and Villaraigosa – whose own cluster concepts were heavily influenced by Green Dot – have heard the same response from district officials: They’ll take the proposals under consideration. So many people eager to have a hand in the district is an opportunity LAUSD should embrace, Barr said. “If the mayor were running some clusters, if we were running some clusters and if basic tenets were adhered to, then things would be humming,” Barr said. “Some friendly competition would be great.” Cortines credited the district with having some of the best practices in the nation, but he said they are not implemented consistently and coherently. That’s why the mayor’s team is urging the district to create a plan that includes a timeline for implementation and bringing it to scale – a process to which they would love to contribute. Regalado said Brewer is wise to take his time because he’s in a precarious position in a situation fraught with political danger. Negotiations with the powerful teachers union are strained. United Teachers Los Angeles is averse to expanding the charter movement, and the mayor is exerting political pressure on the board elections. But district officials are also aware that if they reject Barr’s offer, the maverick charter leader could home in on a school like Locke and create a parent uprising that would force them to allow control of the school. Cortines said the problem with LAUSD administrators seems to be a lack of urgency, particularly in taking their time to accept partnerships. “I certainly think there’s the rhetoric, but I don’t hear that, `Come July1 or September, we will do this,”‘ said Cortines, whose key adviser on the education team, Marshall Tuck, was hired from Green Dot. “It’s one thing to talk about it, and it’s one thing to study things to death. I think there’s the wherewithal, but where is the will? Why aren’t we doing something together?” Regalado thinks the mayor will have a role in LAUSD even if he can’t achieve a majority of supporters on the school board – although that would make his mission much easier. The mayor’s key goal has always been overseeing the clusters, since a small group of schools is manageable, with measurable results. And it is a tangible demonstration of success that would give him crowing rights that he could use if he decided to seek higher office. “If he gets a majority, he’ll get a defined role in the clusters without the political wrangling, but I still think he gets clusters no matter how the elections turn out,” he said. “They’ll feel they have to give this mayor something because they’ll feel he will be their worst nightmare and critic if they don’t have a role for him.” Several reform plans Proposal: Go smaller It’s black and white A lack of urgency naush.boghossian@dailynews.com (818) 713-3722 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
first_img`Don’t you think – because of that program – society benefits?” an actor friend of mine asked me recently. She referred to a taxpayer-provided health-care program that she “turned to” during one of the many “down periods” during her career. “Who told you to go into acting?” I said. “Some careers – whether an actor, a baseball player or a ski bum – are high-risk and low-reward. Why should taxpayers support your career choice?” “But didn’t you get scholarships and grants to continue your education past high school?” she asked. “Yes,” I responded, “because, unfortunately, government got into the business of funding students to go to college. I would have preferred to have gone to a bank and applied for money.” Question: Should taxpayers, through government programs and policies, support the choices of other people? Take health care. On the presidential campaign trail, candidates on both sides of the aisle talk of the nation’s “health-care crisis” and offer varying schemes to use taxpayer money to “solve” the problem of those without health-care insurance. Never mind that, of those born in America, 86 percent have health care. Or that many of the so-called 44 million without health-care insurance include the estimated 11 mil- lion to 20 million illegal aliens. Or that 14 million of those households earning more than $50,000 lack health-care insurance, over 7 million of them in households earning more than $75,000. What about government welfare? Most high school students read Alexis de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, the Frenchman’s famous examination of what makes America tick. Few read, however, the book he wrote a few years later, called Memoir on Pauperism. Tocqueville noticed in the 1830s that despite its wealth, England seemed to have the greatest number of street beggars. Why? England enacted one of the world’s first welfare programs. “I am deeply convinced,” wrote Tocqueville, “that any permanent, regular administrative system whose aim will be to provide for the needs of the poor will breed more miseries than it can cure, will deprave the population that it wants to help and comfort, will in time reduce the rich to being no more than the tenant-farmers of the poor, will dry up the sources of savings, will stop the accumulation of capital, will retard the development of trade, will benumb human industry and activity, and will culminate by bringing about a violent revolution in the State, when the number of those who receive alms will have become as large as those who give it, and the indigent, no longer being able to take from the impoverished rich the means of providing for his needs, will find it easier to plunder them of all their property at one stroke than to ask for their help.” “So by all means,” I told my actor friend, “pursue your dreams. Just do so with your eyes open – and on your own dime.” Larry Elder is an attorney, syndicated columnist and national radio talk-show host. He can be heard from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday on KABC-AM 790. His e-mail address is sage@larryelder.com.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “Why would it be better to go to a bank?” “Well,” I said, “taxpayers would not subsidize my college choice and major. Secondly, a lender would likely require a major in something that would lead to a job so that the lender gets repaid. We, therefore, would produce fewer art history, English lit and drama majors. Or students might pursue double majors, so that if the `dream’ career fails to materialize, there is a viable alternative.” I showed her a recent sympathetic article in a major newspaper about the lives and struggle of several New York actors. They, for the most part, happily pursued their high- risk careers while using wit and creativity to survive in a high-cost city. The actors’ ages ranged from 34 to 67. In two cases, after the actors’ plays ended, they resorted to unemployment compensation. This is actually a government program that pays out-of-work people. Government requires employers to pay an unemployment tax, an inefficient system that discourages people from looking for work. Employers, as with all taxes, pass along the expense by raising prices charged to their consumers. So in the end we, the taxpayers, pay. In another case an actor obtained, at long last, a government-subsidized apartment for $700 a month. New York, which once had a rich and varied supply of apartments, began rent control during World War II. While this benefits those tenants lucky enough or connected enough to land an apartment, the policy reduces the available supply of apartments and prevents landlords from getting fair market value from their investment. last_img

first_imgWhatever was blowing in the wind was on Bob Dylan’s mind Wednesday as the music legend launched a new radio show on satellite service XM by explaining his theme would be the weather. “Into each life some rain must fall,” Dylan said. “Trouble may be waiting along the way.” Dylan spun tunes by Judy Garland (“Come Rain or Come Shine”), Muddy Waters (“Blow, Wind, Blow”) and Joe Jones (“California Sun”) during the hourlong program broadcast on XM’s Deep Tracks (XM 40) and the Village (XM 15) channels, with reruns through the weekend. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREOregon Ducks football players get stuck on Disney ride during Rose Bowl event160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_imggetty 1 Bristol City were handed a home tie against holders Manchester United and West Ham were dealt another London derby as the draw for the quarter-finals of the Carabao Cup was finally made.The Robins – the only Championship side left in the competition – clinched their place in the last eight with a 4-1 victory over Crystal Palace on Tuesday.The Hammers, who came from 2-0 down to beat Tottenham 3-2 on Wednesday night, will travel to Arsenal in the last eight.Chelsea host Bournemouth and Manchester City travel to Leicester in a draw which was delayed by almost two hours.In keeping with the English Football League’s innovative draws in this season’s competition, this one was due to be broadcast live on Twitter and conducted by former England rugby player Matt Dawson and ex-England cricketer Phil Tufnell.However, as with the previous draws, it did not run entirely smoothly.Due to start at 4pm, viewers were left staring at a holding screen for 25 minutes before the sponsors tweeted that the draw had been put back until 5pm due to a “minor technical glitch at Twitter HQ”.Eventually, a pre-recorded draw arrived on the Carabao Cup’s feed at 5.50pm.Twitter users were predictably quick to ridicule the latest mishap. Bristol City vice-chairman Jon Lansdown, among those awaiting the draw, tweeted: “Have the clocks gone back already?”Earlier draws had seen Charlton pulled out of the hat twice, confusion over which teams were at home and away, and criticism over the decision to hold the draw in Beijing at 4.15am UK time.An EFL statement read: “The EFL would like to apologise for a number of third party technical issues that affected coverage of today’s previously advertised Carabao Cup round five live draw at Twitter HQ.“The EFL has received an apology from Twitter UK for the delay which is believed to have occurred as a result of a faulty encoder. The EFL has requested a full explanation into the events that led to this afternoon’s unacceptable delay.” Twitter also apologised to supporters via its UK Twitter account. A spokesman said: “We’re sorry for the issues that led to the delay of today’s draw.“We would also like to apologise to the thousands of supporters who had been patiently awaiting news of who their team would be playing.”The ties are due to take place in the week commencing December 18.Chelsea v BournemouthArsenal v West HamLeicester v Manchester CityBristol City v Manchester Unitedcenter_img The Carabao Cup first round will take place tonight last_img read more

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESurfer attacked by shark near Channel Islands calls rescue a ‘Christmas miracle’Her sense of dej vu is being shared by voters throughout the state this election season. California voters have approved major statewide education bonds in all but one election year during the past decade at a cost of more than $37 billion. Combined with scores of local school bonds passed during the same time, California voters since 1996 have authorized $95 billion in borrowing for school construction – more than in the previous 50 years combined. As Californians this fall confront another mega education bond – Proposition 1D – polls show voters are becoming wary of more bonds. If approved, the measure would push total school construction borrowing for the decade to well over $100 billion, before interest. There also are signs that the state’s borrowing cycle may not be sustainable. Even before this year’s bond – which would add $680 million in annual repayment costs if approved – California’s bills to cover past education bonds are reaching record levels. SACRAMENTO – Voters in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area suburb of Discovery Bay approved a contentious school bond in June to refurbish the city’s middle school. In November, they’ll face another ballot measure seeking to build a new high school. And that’s not all. They also will be asked to vote on a $10.4 billion statewide education bond – part of a record public-works package supported by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders. Altogether, the November election will mark the 19th time in four years a local or state school bond has appeared on a Contra Costa County ballot. “I’ll vote for it, but there really is a feeling of `Oh, God, are we doing this again?”‘ said Maria Sturdivant, a candidate for the Byron Union School District in Discovery Bay. And despite its size, Proposition 1D won’t cover the remaining need. The measure would account for only about a quarter of the state’s school construction needs for the next decade, according to long-term bond plans the Schwarzenegger administration released in January. Even if Proposition 1D is approved, voters likely will face an additional $40 billion or more in state and local school bonds before 2015, according to estimates by state officials and school groups. Education proponents promise the cycle of school bonds will someday level off, but for now they say the continuous ballot requests simply reflect the need. California does not set aside money in the state’s annual budget for school construction. That forces local districts to rely almost entirely on bond money to pay for everything from air conditioners and leaky roofs to refurbished classrooms. $26 million a day “I think intuitively voters understand that buildings get old and need to be brought up to speed, and this is how we pay for that,” said Scott Plotkin, executive director of the California School Boards Association. Between local and state bonds, public schools and colleges in the state have spent an average of $26 million a day – every day – for the past 10 years on construction or refurbishing. Proponents say the money has been well spent. School districts have built 40,000 new classrooms and modernized 97,000 others. Colleges have also built new campuses and upgraded labs. Yet by other measures, progress has remained elusive. In 1998, after voters approved $9 billion in statewide education bonds, a Department of Finance report estimated that an additional $10 billion in state bonds would cover California’s share of school construction needs for a decade. Since then, voters have approved an additional $25 billion in state bonds, but the remaining estimated need has only grown. In January, the department pegged the state’s outstanding need at about $11 billion. The governor’s plan suggested that Californians will need to approve 31/2 times that by 2015, plus local matching bonds. The state Department of Education calculates the need differently. California each day through 2010 must build 18 new classrooms and modernize 25 others. Proposition 1D won’t cover the demand alone. To build that many classrooms, voters will have to approve billions more in bond money in 2008 – even though the state’s K-12 population will grow by less than 1 percent during that time. California already spends more per pupil on school construction than any other state, said Eric Brunner, an economics professor at Connecticut’s Quinnipiac University. He calculated that California from 2001 to 2004 spent an average of $1,245 per K-12 student on construction, compared with a national average of $1,086. That even outstripped the amount spent in other states with growing student populations. “The need seems to be a moving target,” Brunner said. Growing burden Repaying the school-construction bonds, meanwhile, has become an ever-larger burden. California this year will make payments on 18 school bonds dating back to 1974. The combined cost will exceed $1.3 billion. Next year, the annual cost will jump to $2.3 billion and remain there for the rest of the decade. A large part of the cost is interest. Of this year’s costs, the state will pay $493 million toward principal debt and $834 million in interest. If Proposition 1D passes, the state’s annual school bond debt payments would top $3 billion, taking away money from the state’s general fund, which pays for social services and most other programs. One potential weakness of Proposition 1D is that it would allocate money for programs that seem to go beyond traditional brick-and-mortar classrooms. Among the expenditures are $500 million for “career technical facilities,” $100 million for unspecified “environment-friendly projects” and $200 million for a University of California medical curriculum focused on “telemedicine.” The California Taxpayer Protection Committee argues that too much goes for such earmarks. Backers have other worries. They’re concerned the ceaseless cycle of bonds, combined with the rest of this year’s infrastructure package for roads, levees and housing, might create voter fatigue for new spending. This could be the year that breaks the string of success that education advocates have had in persuading Californians to approve school bonds, said Bob Stern, president of the Center for Governmental Studies in Los Angeles. “Voters may think, I’ve been there and done that,” he said.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

first_img Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury ADVICE Mauricio Pochettino has revealed Tottenham are ‘not optimistic’ about Dele Alli’s hamstring injury as the club’s injury crisis deepens.The Spurs midfielder limped off during the 2-1 victory over Fulham and it looks extremely unlikely he will be fit to face Chelsea in the second leg of the Carabao Cup semi-final on Thursday.That means Spurs could be without Harry Kane, Heung-min Son, Lucas Moura and Alli for the Stamford Bridge clash, which they lead 1-0 after the first leg.Pochettino told talkSPORT: “Everyone saw on the pitch that it was his left hamstring and we need to assess in the next few days. REVEALED Latest Football News The midfielder limped off clutching his hamstring 2 RANKED Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade MONEY Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won no dice REVEALED Tottenham will wait to learn the full extent of Dele Alli’s injury “Of course, we are not too optimistic because it’s a muscle which you need to take care of. But we’ll see.“We hope that it’s not a big issue and he can be with us as soon as possible.” BEST OF huge blow 2 Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Alli equalised for Spurs after they had fallen behind to Fernando Llorente’s own-goal at Craven Cottage.And Spurs snatched a winner right at the death when Harry Winks stooped low to score his first goal of the season. Pochettino believes Winks can become one of the best midfielders in England if he adds more goals to his game.He added: “I think can [score more goals]. It’s just about being calm and having security about your game.“If you have a midfielder with his quality, who plays like he does in possession and without the ball, then you add more goals, I think he’ll become one of the best midfielders in England.”last_img read more

first_img huge blow no dice “It says a lot about the squad we have got,” he said. “To lose the captain that early was difficult but we dealt with it well. Fabinho came on and did well then we scored.“It was a good result. We didn’t play our best but it is about defending well and getting three points.“This guy [Van Dijk] got another goal. To be honest, he should get more given his height!” Sadio Mane scored Liverpool’s first RANKED 2 REVEALED LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS James Milner revealed that Liverpool and other English clubs will not want to play each other in the Champions League quarter-finals.The Reds joined Tottenham Hotspur, Manchester City and Manchester United in the last eight of the competition by beating Bayern Munich 3-1 on Wednesday. Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won REVEALED James Milner took over as captain after Jordan Henderson got injured Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury BEST OF 2 ADVICE Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card MONEY Sadio Mane scored twice in the Allianz Arena with Virgil van Dijk also heading in.Jurgen Klopp’s side will be hoping to go one better than last year’s appearance in the final.The quarter-final, and semi-final, draw will be made on Friday with English clubs making up half of the teams still left in this year’s Champions League. Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade “It is good for English football,” Milner told BT Sport after game. “That’s what you want. I don’t think we want to play each other in the next round but we’ll see who we get.“We have good feelings from last year so hopefully we can carry that on and go as far as we can.”Jordan Henderson had to be substituted early in the first half after picking up an injury.Milner, standing alongside Virgil van Dijk, thought Liverpool coped well with the loss of their captain and adjusted well. Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move last_img read more