Meet The First Electric Pickup Trucks Nope Not Rivian R1T Video

first_imgNow, all the EV hoopla in the U.S. seems to center around trucks and for good reason. The pickup truck segment is super hot right now, largely due to low gas prices. However, the utility of these types of vehicles is widely appreciated by consumers, including the EV crowd.Add in the fact that both General Motor and Ford jumped in on the electric pickup truck bandwagon and it’s clear this is the must-watch segment.But let’s take a step backDid you know electric trucks aren’t new? We’re you aware that both Ford and Chevy had electric trucks on offer way back in the early days of modern EVs?As you’ll see in this video, electric trucks actually date back a long, long time ago. But what is new with this current EV truck wave is that we’re seeing big trucks now. Ones that are highly capable like the Atlis XT (image below). Electric is no longer limited to small trucks. Nor are EV pickups short-range and light duty.Today’s electric pickup trucks are real trucks and that makes a world of difference.Atlis XT Pickup TruckFord Ranger Electric Truck:The Ford Ranger EV (Electric Vehicle) is a battery electric vehicle that was produced by Ford. It was produced starting in the 1998 model year through 2002 and is no longer in production. It is built upon a light truck chassis used in the Ford Ranger.Chevy S-10 Electric Truck:The Chevrolet S-10 Electric was an American electric-powered vehicle built by Chevrolet. It was introduced in 1997, updated in 1998, and then discontinued. It was an OEM BEV variant of Chevrolet’s S-10 pickup truck. The S-10 Electric was solely powered by electricity, and was marketed primarily to utility fleet customers.Video description:Believe it or not, there is actually a history to electric pickup trucks! Rivian was not the first.Believe it or not, electric pickup trucks aren’t a new thing. In fact, a couple major automakers had EV pickup trucks on offer not too long ago.However, it wasn’t until Rivian hit the stage with its R1T electric pickup truck in LA that the world took notice of electric trucks in a big way.More EV Truck News Rivian R1T & R1S: Is Electric Battery Pack Designed Right? Video Atlis XT Electric Pickup Truck Revealed: 500-Mile Range, Tows 35,000 Pounds Rivian Talks R1T Electric Truck & R1S SUV Sales Expectations Source: Electric Vehicle News Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 10, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

New Texas ProInsurance Law may Punish Hurricane Harvey Victims

first_img Remember me Lost your password? Password Usernamecenter_img Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Tens of thousands of Texas homeowners and business owners who have suffered billions of dollars in property damages from Hurricane Harvey may soon discover that a new state law eliminates long-time legal incentives for insurance companies to pay victims quickly and fully for their losses . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content.last_img

Organ transplant patients have higher risk for skin cancer

first_img Source:https://www.aad.org/media/news-releases/skin-cancer-in-organ-transplant-patients Jul 26 2018While anyone can develop skin cancer, regardless of age, race or gender, certain groups of people have a higher risk of getting the disease than others. Because organ transplant patients must take medication to suppress their immune system, they are among those with an increased risk -; and the skin cancers that develop in these patients are often more aggressive, with a poor prognosis.”Individuals who receive organ transplants need to take immunosuppressive medications for the rest of their lives, and this makes it more difficult for their bodies to fight disease, including skin cancer,” says board-certified dermatologist Christina Lee Chung, MD, FAAD, former director of the Drexel Dermatology Center for Transplant Patients in Philadelphia. “On top of that, some of these medications make the skin more sensitive to the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays, which can further increase patients’ skin cancer risk.”According to Dr. Chung, organ transplant patients have a higher skin cancer risk if they have fairer skin, are male, have a pre-transplant history of skin cancer, receive their organ at age 50 or older, or have a lung or heart transplant. While skin cancer can affect organ transplant patients of any skin tone, she says, specific risk factors in these patients may vary based on their race. For example, she says, Caucasian patients have the highest skin cancer risk and are most likely to develop the disease in sun-exposed areas, as are Asian transplant patients.In contrast, Latino and black transplant patients are more likely to develop skin cancer in areas that are protected from the sun, Dr. Chung says, with black patients especially at risk for human papillomavirus-related cancers in the genital area. While more research will be necessary to establish the unique skin cancer risk factors in organ transplant patients with darker skin tones, she says, a preliminary study she conducted at Drexel University suggests that those risk factors may include a history of warts, emigration to the U.S. from a country near the equator, a history of sexually transmitted infections, or a history of medical conditions that require immunosuppressive medications to be taken before transplant surgery.Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerLiving with advanced breast cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumors”When it comes to skin cancer risk factors in this population, it’s not one-size-fits-all,” Dr. Chung says. “However, it’s important for all organ transplant patients, regardless of skin tone, to recognize their skin cancer risk; protect themselves from sun exposure, which could further increase that risk; and regularly examine their entire body, including the genital area, for signs of skin cancer so they can detect the disease early, when it’s most treatable.”The American Academy of Dermatology recommends a comprehensive sun protection plan that involves seeking shade, wearing protective clothing, and generously applying a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to exposed skin. The AAD also recommends that everyone conduct regular skin cancer self-exams, asking a partner to help them check hard-to-see areas like their back. Anyone who notices any new spots, any suspicious spots that are different from the others on their skin, or anything changing, itching or bleeding should see a board-certified dermatologist.”In addition to taking action toward skin cancer prevention and detection, organ transplant patients also should establish a relationship with a board-certified dermatologist after their procedure,” Dr. Chung says. “A dermatologist can evaluate your unique risk factors and help you ensure the health of your largest organ: your skin.”​last_img read more

New neuralnetwork model discovers speech patterns indicative of depression

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Aug 31 2018To diagnose depression, clinicians interview patients, asking specific questions — about, say, past mental illnesses, lifestyle, and mood — and identify the condition based on the patient’s responses.In recent years, machine learning has been championed as a useful aid for diagnostics. Machine-learning models, for instance, have been developed that can detect words and intonations of speech that may indicate depression. But these models tend to predict that a person is depressed or not, based on the person’s specific answers to specific questions. These methods are accurate, but their reliance on the type of question being asked limits how and where they can be used.In a paper being presented at the Interspeech conference, MIT researchers detail a neural-network model that can be unleashed on raw text and audio data from interviews to discover speech patterns indicative of depression. Given a new subject, it can accurately predict if the individual is depressed, without needing any other information about the questions and answers.The researchers hope this method can be used to develop tools to detect signs of depression in natural conversation. In the future, the model could, for instance, power mobile apps that monitor a user’s text and voice for mental distress and send alerts. This could be especially useful for those who can’t get to a clinician for an initial diagnosis, due to distance, cost, or a lack of awareness that something may be wrong.”The first hints we have that a person is happy, excited, sad, or has some serious cognitive condition, such as depression, is through their speech,” says first author Tuka Alhanai, a researcher in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL). “If you want to deploy [depression-detection] models in scalable way … you want to minimize the amount of constraints you have on the data you’re using. You want to deploy it in any regular conversation and have the model pick up, from the natural interaction, the state of the individual.”The technology could still, of course, be used for identifying mental distress in casual conversations in clinical offices, adds co-author James Glass, a senior research scientist in CSAIL. “Every patient will talk differently, and if the model sees changes maybe it will be a flag to the doctors,” he says. “This is a step forward in seeing if we can do something assistive to help clinicians.”The other co-author on the paper is Mohammad Ghassemi, a member of the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science (IMES).Context-free modelingThe key innovation of the model lies in its ability to detect patterns indicative of depression, and then map those patterns to new individuals, with no additional information. “We call it ‘context-free,’ because you’re not putting any constraints into the types of questions you’re looking for and the type of responses to those questions,” Alhanai says.Other models are provided with a specific set of questions, and then given examples of how a person without depression responds and examples of how a person with depression responds — for example, the straightforward inquiry, “Do you have a history of depression?” It uses those exact responses to then determine if a new individual is depressed when asked the exact same question. “But that’s not how natural conversations work,” Alhanai says.The researchers, on the other hand, used a technique called sequence modeling, often used for speech processing. With this technique, they fed the model sequences of text and audio data from questions and answers, from both depressed and non-depressed individuals, one by one. As the sequences accumulated, the model extracted speech patterns that emerged for people with or without depression. Words such as, say, “sad,” “low,” or “down,” may be paired with audio signals that are flatter and more monotone.Related StoriesTeens who can describe negative emotions are better protected against depressionNew structured approach to managing patients with depression in primary careCPAP treatment for sleep apnea can improve depression symptomsIndividuals with depression may also speak slower and use longer pauses between words. These text and audio identifiers for mental distress have been explored in previous research. It was ultimately up to the model to determine if any patterns were predictive of depression or not.”The model sees sequences of words or speaking style, and determines that these patterns are more likely to be seen in people who are depressed or not depressed,” Alhanai says. “Then, if it sees the same sequences in new subjects, it can predict if they’re depressed too.”This sequencing technique also helps the model look at the conversation as a whole and note differences between how people with and without depression speak over time.Detecting depressionThe researchers trained and tested their model on a dataset of 142 interactions from the Distress Analysis Interview Corpus that contains audio, text, and video interviews of patients with mental-health issues and virtual agents controlled by humans. Each subject is rated in terms of depression on a scale between 0 to 27, using the Personal Health Questionnaire. Scores above a cutoff between moderate (10 to 14) and moderately severe (15 to 19) are considered depressed, while all others below that threshold are considered not depressed. Out of all the subjects in the dataset, 28 (20 percent) are labeled as depressed.In experiments, the model was evaluated using metrics of precision and recall. Precision measures which of the depressed subjects identified by the model were diagnosed as depressed. Recall measures the accuracy of the model in detecting all subjects who were diagnosed as depressed in the entire dataset. In precision, the model scored 71 percent and, on recall, scored 83 percent. The averaged combined score for those metrics, considering any errors, was 77 percent. In the majority of tests, the researchers’ model outperformed nearly all other models.One key insight from the research, Alhanai notes, is that, during experiments, the model needed much more data to predict depression from audio than text. With text, the model can accurately detect depression using an average of seven question-answer sequences. With audio, the model needed around 30 sequences. “That implies that the patterns in words people use that are predictive of depression happen in shorter time span in text than in audio,” Alhanai says. Such insights could help the MIT researchers, and others, further refine their models.This work represents a “very encouraging” pilot, Glass says. But now the researchers seek to discover what specific patterns the model identifies across scores of raw data.”Right now it’s a bit of a black box,” Glass says. “These systems, however, are more believable when you have an explanation of what they’re picking up. … The next challenge is finding out what data it’s seized upon.”The researchers also aim to test these methods on additional data from many more subjects with other cognitive conditions, such as dementia. “It’s not so much detecting depression, but it’s a similar concept of evaluating, from an everyday signal in speech, if someone has cognitive impairment or not,” Alhanai says. Source:http://news.mit.edu/2018/neural-network-model-detect-depression-conversations-0830last_img read more

Podcast Smelling the Opposite Sex Mysterious Lines in the Desert and Surviving

00:0000:0000:00 Do certain smells influence our perceptions of gender? What was the purpose of ancient white lines in the Chilean desert? And how did birds survive the dinosaur apocalypse? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Science’s Sarah Crespi. Smelling the Opposite Sex, Mysterious Lines in the Desert, And Surviving the Dinosaur Apocalypse

Astronomers measure the clouds that formed the first galaxies

first_imgKISSIMMEE, FLORIDA—To understand the universe’s very first galaxies, astronomers need to know what they’re made of. But the clouds of gas that birthed them don’t shine with stars like a fully formed galaxy, making them very hard to see. Now, a team has developed a method for measuring the size and mass of clouds of cool, dense gas that existed 11 billion years ago, when the universe was less than 20% of its current age. In the process, they have confirmed that they are big enough and massive enough to form galaxies. Astronomers had previously been able to detect the presence of such clouds if there was a bright source of light behind them like a quasar—the energetic black hole at the center of a galaxy. As the quasar’s light passes through the gas cloud, hydrogen atoms absorb a specific wavelength of light through a process called Lyman-α absorption. That absorption line in the quasar’s spectrum is a signature of such clouds, which are consequently known as damped Lyman-α (DLα) systems. But the thin beams from quasars don’t reveal whether the DLA cloud is just a small clump or galaxy-sized. Today, a pair of astronomers told the American Astronomical Society meeting here that they have instead used the light from entire galaxies to probe DLα clouds—the equivalent of using searchlight beams compared with a quasar’s laser. With such a broad backlight, they are able to say that the clouds are at least as big as typical galaxies from that era. The image above shows a quasar (white, right) shining its narrow beam through a DLα cloud (center) to Earth; superimposed on the quasar is a galaxy (red) shining a much wider beam through the cloud. To date, the researchers have studied more than 10 such clouds measuring up to 30,000 light-years across. From details of the absorption they can estimate the clouds’ densities, and from that their masses. The technique requires many hours of observations with the world’s largest telescopes, which makes it hard to apply widely now. But when the next generation of 30-meter-class telescopes comes online in the next decade, the astronomers say they will be able to routinely probe the cradle of early galaxies.last_img read more

Top stories A Nobel for hungry cells a CRISPR patent battle and

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email The p53 protein sounds the alarm to kill cells with DNA damage, preventing them from becoming cancerous. Of the nearly 1.7 million people diagnosed with cancer each year in the United States alone, about half have mutated versions of p53. But it has been nearly impossible to get a good look at the protein in action. Now, one computational biologist is using supercomputers to view the quivering activity of millions of p53 atoms as they wrap themselves around DNA strands, an essential part of the cellular destruction dance. Some simulations are also revealing something else: a fingerhold for a potential cancer-treating drug.Dramatic twists could upend patent battle over CRISPR genome-editing methodThe 9-month-old patent battle over CRISPR, a novel genome-editing tool that could have immense commercial value, has taken two surprising twists. Last week, attorneys for the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, one of the research organizations vying for CRISPR rights, submitted motions that could let it win even if it loses. And this week, a new player in the drama, a French biopharmaceutical company called Cellectis, may have made the whole fight moot, revealing it has just been issued patents that it says broadly cover genome-editing methods, including CRISPR.The bigger your brain, the longer you yawnScientists still don’t agree on why we yawn or where it came from. So in a new study, scientists watched YouTube videos of 29 different yawning mammals, including mice, kittens, foxes, hedgehogs, walruses, elephants, and humans. (Here is a particularly cute montage used in the study.) They discovered a pattern: Small-brained animals with fewer neurons in the wrinkly outer layer of the brain, called the cortex, had shorter yawns than large-brained animals with more cortical neurons. The study lends support to a long-held hypothesis that yawning has an important physiological effect, such as increasing blood flow to the brain and cooling it down.‘Game-changing’ study suggests first Polynesians voyaged all the way from East AsiaIt was only 3000 years ago that humans first set foot on Fiji and other isolated islands of the Pacific, having sailed across thousands of kilometers of ocean. Yet the identity of these intrepid seafarers has been lost to time. They left a trail of distinctive red pottery but few other clues, and scientists have confronted two different scenarios: The explorers were either farmers who sailed directly from mainland East Asia to the remote islands, or people who mixed with hunter-gatherers they met along the way in Melanesia, including Papua New Guinea. Now, the first genome-wide study of ancient DNA from prehistoric Polynesians has boosted the first idea: that these ancient mariners were East Asians who swept out into the Pacific.Now that you’ve got the scoop on this week’s hottest Science news, come back Monday to test your smarts on our weekly quiz! Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img Nobel honors discoveries on how cells eat themselvesThis year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi, a cell biologist at the Tokyo Institute of Technology’s Frontier Research Center, for his work on autophagy, the process in which cells degrade and recycle cellular components. Understanding autophagy is key to unlocking treatments for diseases like cancer, diabetes, and Huntington disease.This protein is mutated in half of all cancers. New drugs aim to fix it before it’s too late Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

Mexicos new science minister is a plant biologist who opposes transgenic crops

first_img Mexico’s new science minister is a plant biologist who opposes transgenic crops GDA/EL UNIVERSAL/MéXICO/ASSOCIATED PRESS “I’m not a Luddite who is scared of technology,” Elena Álvarez-Buylla says. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country MEXICO CITY—In early June, evolutionary developmental biologist Elena Álvarez-Buylla received an out-of-the-blue phone call from the campaign of Andrés Manuel López Obrador, then the front-runner in Mexico’s presidential election, with a question. If López Obrador won, would she consider becoming the next director of the National Council of Science and Technology (Conacyt), the country’s science ministry and primary granting agency? “My first reaction was to say, ‘I can’t,’” recalls Álvarez-Buylla, a professor at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) here. “I have a great passion for scientific research,” and she couldn’t imagine leaving the laboratory.But after thinking it over for a few hours, her passion for public service took over. “I started to have a feeling that I couldn’t say no,” says Álvarez-Buylla, who founded and leads Mexico’s Union of Scientists Committed to Society (UCCS). “It doesn’t matter how big the personal sacrifice is. … This is a unique and historic moment” for Mexico.López Obrador, a progressive populist, won the presidency in a landslide and will be sworn in on 1 December; Álvarez-Buylla is now preparing to leave the lab bench and assume her new role. She will be the president’s primary science adviser and determine priorities for Conacyt’s approximately $1.5 billion budget, which funds grants to scientists working in the public and private sectors and supports tens of thousands of Mexican students at home and abroad. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Email By Lizzie WadeOct. 4, 2018 , 11:30 AM Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Many scientists are delighted that one of their own will lead Conacyt—most of Álvarez-Buylla’s predecessors were career administrators—and that she’ll be the first woman to do so. But critics worry about her opposition to genetically modified (GM) maize, which Álvarez-Buylla fears could spoil the country’s astonishing agricultural biodiversity. They also worry that in her commitment to socially relevant science, she may neglect basic research. A petition asking López Obrador to pick another director has gathered more than 1000 signatures.”There’s not a clear boundary” between her research and her activism, says Rodrigo Álvarez Aguilera, a science teacher here and one of the petition’s organizers. Biochemist Luis Herrera Estrella, director of the National Laboratory of Genomics for Biodiversity in Irapuato, says Álvarez-Buylla is “a very good scientist” but calls her views on GM organisms “radical.”Born into a family of scientists, Álvarez-Buylla studied plant biology at UNAM and received her doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. She returned to UNAM in 1992, where she now runs several research groups. Colleagues praise her contributions to the understanding of plant root development and how plant genotypes influence their traits. “There’s no question that the research she does is fantastic,” says her former collaborator Chelsea Specht, a plant evolutionary biologist at Cornell University. “And her advocacy is based in very good research.”That advocacy began after a 2001 Nature paper reported that genetic material from the cauliflower mosaic virus, a common addition to GM plants, had been found in native maize varieties sampled in Mexico’s southern state of Oaxaca—likely the result of cross-pollination from industrially grown crops whose origin remains unclear. The finding shocked many because of maize’s all-important role in Mexican history and culture. Maize domestication began here about 9000 years ago, and Mexico now boasts at least 59 native varieties, called landraces, each exquisitely adapted to regional environmental and climatic conditions. Some possess unusual characteristics; in August, for instance, researchers reported that a landrace from Oaxaca can fix nitrogen from the atmosphere with the help of microbes, a trait known from beans and other legumes but never before found in maize. The adaptation allows it to thrive in nitrogen-poor soils; breeding it into other maize varieties could be a boon for farmers and might help reduce fertilizer use. Other landraces may have useful adaptations as well.Álvarez-Buylla led a team that confirmed the results of the 2001 study and has continued to hunt for transgenic DNA and any possible effects in Mexican landraces, work that helped her win Mexico’s National Science Prize in 2017. She says she has nothing against genetic engineering in itself; her team creates and studies GM plants in the lab, and such experiments should not be prohibited or restricted, she says. “I’m not a Luddite who is scared of technology.” But her own experiments have shown introduced genes can have unpredictable effects. “If a transgene is inserted in one part of [a plant’s] genome, it can be silenced and have no effect. If it’s inserted in another part, it can lead to a tremendous change,” she says. That unpredictability makes it too risky to allow GM maize anywhere near Mexico’s landraces, she argues. Planting GM maize in Mexico has been prohibited since 2013, pending the outcome of a lawsuit. Álvarez-Buylla has been an outspoken proponent of a permanent ban.Herrera Estrella, who develops GM plants, disputes the risks. In the more than 50 years that landraces have cross-pollinated with commercial, industrially grown maize varieties, “it has had no negative effect. … It’s not contamination. It’s a completely natural biological process,” he says. If a foreign gene harms the growth or development of maize, farmers simply won’t use seeds from that individual plant the next year, and the damage won’t be passed on. “Conacyt needs a director with an expansive view of science and technology and the impact they could have on Mexico’s development. I think she has some very biased opinions,” he says.Some scientists have also raised questions about Álvarez-Buylla’s plans to open dialogue between Mexico’s scientific community and Indigenous knowledge producers. “Mexico has the opportunity to contribute to the world something truly new that comes out of a deep hybridization” of those two forms of knowledge, Álvarez-Buylla says. Critics say that philosophy diminishes Western scientific values and achievements. They also worry basic research will suffer because of Álvarez-Buylla’s professed commitment to science that helps solve societal problems such as infant mortality and dwindling water supplies. “That’s a fallacy,” she says; Conacyt will remain supportive of basic research in all fields.Álvarez-Buylla has little administrative experience, but she has proved herself capable at building and managing large research groups, says longtime colleague Daniel Piñro Dalmau, a plant population geneticist at UNAM. She has promised to improve Conacyt’s grant evaluation process, which many say is frustratingly quantitative and completely opaque. “Changing anything in Mexico is really hard,” Piñero Dalmau says. But Álvarez-Buylla “is deeply committed to this country.”*Correction, 4 October, 3:10 p.m.: A previous version of the story misstated where Chelsea Specht works.last_img read more

Podcast The Tragedy of the Commons turns 50 and how Neanderthal DNA

first_img In 1968, Science published the now-famous paper “The Tragedy of the Commons” by ecologist Garrett Hardin. In it, Hardin questioned society’s ability to manage shared resources, concluding that individuals will act in their self-interest and ultimately spoil the resource. Host Meagan Cantwell revisits this classic paper with two experts: Tine De Moor, professor of economics and social history at Utrecht University in the Netherlands, and Brett Frischmann, a professor of law, business, and economics at Villanova University in Pennsylvania. They discuss how premodern societies dealt with common resources and how our current society might apply the concept to a more abstract resource—knowledge.Not all human skulls are the same shape—and if yours is a little less round, you may have your extinct cousins, the Neanderthals, to thank. Meagan speaks with Simon Fisher, neurogeneticist and director of the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, the Netherlands, about why living humans with two Neanderthal gene variants have slightly less round heads—and how studying Neanderthal DNA can help us better understand our own biology.This week’s episode was edited by Podigy.Download a transcript of this episode (PDF)Listen to previous podcasts.About the Science Podcast[Image: Phillip Gunz; Music: Jeffrey Cook] Phillip Gunz last_img read more

R Kellys Lawyers Have His Alleged Sex Tape

first_imgHis lawyer Steve Greenberg told reporters, “We’ll see what it shows, we’ll make our assessment on it.”In May, a grand jury indicted Kelly with 11 more charges pertaining, “Those charges included not only aggravated criminal sexual abuse but also more serious charges: aggravated criminal sexual assault, a Class X felony; and criminal sexual assault, a Class 1 felony.”In addition, police charged the singer in February with 10 counts of aggravated sexual abuse, after which he was arrested at least twice more on related charges.Kelly was arrested Feb. 23 after surrendering to Chicago police following his indictment on the same day for 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse. After spending the weekend in jail because he arguably had trouble paying the $100,000 for bail, a woman friend of his posted his bond.Kelly was taken into custody again for failing to pay more than $160,000 in child support but was released a few days later after someone else paid his bond.One major legal problem that Kelly faces is that Illinois has no statute of limitations on sex crimes against minors. In 2017, Illinois enacted legislation that ended a requirement for child sex abuse victims to file a report within 20 years of turning 18 years old.“The new charges resulted from an offense that allegedly took place in 2010,” USA Today reported. “Because few details were made available, it’s not clear whether the victim from that case is new or one of the women from the 10 counts filed against him in February.”SEE ALSO:R. Kelly’s New Lawyer Who Used To Prosecute Sex Crimes Insists Disgraced Singer ‘Is Not Guilty’This Colin Kaepernick Retweet Says Everything You Need To Know About The NFL Players’ Anthem GrievanceMeet Jogger Joe, The Man Who Took Racist Cue From BBQ Becky In Tossing Homeless Man’s Clothes R. Kelly‘s lawyers will have a tough fight to keep him out of jail when he goes to trial next year. The singer’s alleged sex tape with a minor from two decades is now in the hands of his defense attorneys.See Also: 5 Things We Want To See From Cory Booker In The First Democratic Presidential DebateAccording to CNN.com, Judge Lawrence Flood put a protective order on the tape being leaked, saying, “If there’s any violation of this protective order, I’m going to impose sanctions, severe sanctions. I just want everybody on notice with that. Plus, there could be criminal implications to violation of this protective order.” Chicago , R Kelly , sex tape More By NewsOne Staff R Kelly CBS interview screenshot 17 R. Kelly Memes Destroying His Tragic Interview With Gayle Kingcenter_img A$AP Rocky Being In A Swedish Prison Will Not Stop Her From Going To The Country That Showed Her ‘So Much Love’ Gov. Cuomo Slams Mayor Bill De Blasio For The Eric Garner Case But He Also Failed The Family AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisMoreShare to EmailEmailEmail Meghan McCain Whines That She Can’t Attack llhan Omar Because Trump Is Too Racistlast_img read more

Organizers of geneediting meeting blast Chinese study but call for pathway to

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Organizers of the second International Summit on Human Genome Editing Some say a global moratorium on germline gene editing is called for in the wake of He Jiankui’s controversial study. Progress over the last 3 years and the discussions at the current summit … suggest that it is time to define a rigorous, responsible translational pathway toward [clinical] trials. luismmolina/iStockPhoto Without mentioning He by name, the statement refers to “an unexpected and deeply disturbing claim that human embryos had been edited and implanted, resulting in a pregnancy and the birth of twins.” The procedure was “irresponsible and failed to conform with international norms,” the organizers say; its alleged flaws include inadequate medical justification, a poorly designed protocol, a failure to protect the welfare of the babies, and a lack of transparency at all stages of the study. The authors recommended an independent assessment to verify that He’s claimed DNA modifications were actually made.The committee reiterated its position that it’s too early for any clinical use of germline editing. But, it said, “Progress over the last 3 years and the discussions at the current summit … suggest that it is time to define a rigorous, responsible translational pathway toward [clinical] trials. Such a pathway will require establishing standards for preclinical evidence and accuracy of gene modification, assessment of competency for practitioners of clinical trials, enforceable standards of professional behavior, and strong partnerships with patients and patient advocacy groups.”Some had hoped for a call to ban human trials for the time being. “Given the current early state of genome editing technology, I’m in favor of a moratorium on implantation of edited embryos … until we have come up with a thoughtful set of safety requirements first,” CRISPR pioneer Feng Zhang of the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, said in a statement issued on 26 November. A petition circulated online since yesterday and emailed to the committee and journalists urged the group to “call on governments and the United Nations (UN) to establish enforceable moratoria prohibiting reproductive experiments with human genetic engineering.” The petition, organized by the Center for Genetics and Society in Berkeley and Human Genetics Alert in London, had drawn the support of 11 organizations and more than 100 individuals earlier today.”We don’t believe anymore that the scientific community can self-regulate,” Jaydee Hanson of the International Center for Technology Assessment in Washington, D.C., said today. If scientists won’t get behind a call for U.N. action, Hanson warned, his and other groups will issue one on their own.The question of self-regulation came up several times during the meeting. As today’s session drew to a close, Baltimore noted how difficult it is for the scientific community—or anyone—to restrain rogue scientists. He’s research “has proven that if you want to be surreptitious in using this technology you can go a surprisingly long way,” he said.The organizers announced that the next summit will be held in London, probably in 2021. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Scientists and ethicists have almost universally condemned He’s work as premature, irresponsible, and unjustified in exposing the girls to long-term risks associated with gene editing for little, if any, medical benefit. A few take a more nuanced view; Harvard University geneticist George Church told Science he feels an “obligation to be balanced” and called the international reaction “extreme.”Prior to the summit, the 14 organizers were undecided about compiling a new statement just 3 years after the last one. But after news of He’s study triggered an international outcry. “We had to” issue a new statement, says Jennifer Doudna of the University of California, Berkeley, a CRISPR pioneer and member of the organizing committee. The group’s chair, David Baltimore of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, read the text to the audience today. HONG KONG, CHINA—An international conference on human gene editing dominated by news of the birth of the world’s first genetically engineered babies concluded today with a statement from the organizers that harshly condemned the controversial study. But it did not call for a global moratorium on similar studies, as some scientists had hoped; instead it called for a “translational pathway” that might eventually bring the ethically fraught technology to patients in a responsible way.The hotly debated study, which apparently resulted in twin baby girls whose genomes were altered in a way that could affect their offspring, came to light on the eve of the second International Summit on Human Genome Editing here. The first summit, held in Washington, D.C., in December 2015, concluded with a statement that specifically said that unless and until safety, efficacy, and ethical and regulatory issues are resolved, “it would be irresponsible to proceed with any clinical use of germline editing,” a reference to genetic modifications that can be passed on to the next generation.But that is exactly what Chinese researcher He Jiankui did, crippling a gene known as CCR5 in hopes of making the babies, as well as their offspring, resistant to HIV infection. After the news was reported, He appeared yesterday at a special session at the summit to defend his work and answer questions from the stunned audience. (He, an associate professor at the Southern University of Science and Technology in nearby Shenzhen, China, withdrew from a second session on embryo editing scheduled for Thursday afternoon.) Organizers of gene-editing meeting blast Chinese study but call for ‘pathway’ to human trials Email By Dennis NormileNov. 29, 2018 , 6:15 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrylast_img read more

NSF NASA NIST would get funding boosts under House spending bill

first_img The National Science Foundation (NSF) would get a 7% budget increase, and NASA a 3.8% bump, under a 2020 spending bill approved today by an appropriations panel of the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill rejects cuts to those and other federal research agencies proposed by President Donald Trump’s administration.The bill includes $73.9 billion in funding for the departments of commerce and justice, as well as independent agencies such as NSF, for the 2020 fiscal year that begins 1 October. It includes “robust funding to address climate change and support scientific research,” said Representative José Serrano (D–NY), chair of the House appropriations subcommittee handling the bill.Some highlights: NSF, NASA, NIST would get funding boosts under House spending bill iStock.com/uschools By Science News StaffMay. 17, 2019 , 3:25 PMcenter_img NSF would receive $8.64 billion, $561 million above its current budget. The Trump administration had requested a cut of 12.5%, or $1 billion, to $7.1 billion. NSF’s research and related activities get an increase of 8.9%, or $586 million, to $7.1 billion. The White House had proposed a 13% cut to $5.6 billion. NASA receives an $815 million increase to $22.3 billion. The Trump administration requested a cut of 2%, or $480 million, to $21 billion. NASA’s science programs receive a $256 million boost to $7.2 billion, a 3.7% increase. The administration requested a cut of 8.7%, or $600 million, to $6.3 billion. Research programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology get an increase of 3.7%, or $27 million, to $751 million. The administration asked for a cut of 15.5%, or $112 million, to $612 million. The budget of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration would stay roughly flat at about $5.4 billion, nearly $1 billion above the president’s request of $4.5 billion. The bill now goes to the full House appropriations panel for a vote. The Senate has yet to release its version of the funding bill, and it is not clear whether Congress and the White House will be able to reach agreement on 2020 spending before the fiscal year begins this fall. If no agreement is reached, 2019 spending levels could be extended into the new fiscal year, or the government could shut down.last_img read more

Millionperson US study of genes and health stumbles over including Native American

first_img Million-person U.S. study of genes and health stumbles over including Native American groups The All of Us project hasn’t been able to recruit at events like the Northern Navajo Nation Fair in Shiprock, New Mexico. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Joseph Yracheta knows the value of genomics-based medicine. As a master’s student, Yracheta, who is of Mexican Indigenous ancestry, studied genetic variants that influence how Native Americans respond to medications. But when it comes to a massive U.S. effort to identify correlations between DNA and health, called All of Us, Yracheta is a skeptic.”I just don’t think tribes should participate in All of Us” because of the lack of clear benefit and a history of mistreatment by researchers and the U.S. government, says Yracheta, who is now studying health disparities among Native Americans as a doctoral student at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. “I don’t think there’s a correct way to do this.” Many tribal leaders and researchers are also hesitant, creating an unexpected obstacle for the ambitious study.Earlier this month, leaders of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, celebrated the 1-year anniversary of the effort, which aims to gather DNA and health records for 1 million volunteers by the end of 2024. They pointed with pride to the study’s diversity: More than 50% of the 143,000 volunteers fully enrolled so far belong to minority groups. They did not mention that Native Americans, who make up 1.7% of the U.S. population, are not formally on board. “I’m very excited and supportive of the research,” says Aaron Payment, tribal chairman for the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians in Michigan and chair of NIH’s Tribal Advisory Committee. But, he adds, “There is a level of frustration and anger and skepticism.” Formal meetings with tribal nations began this month, and NIH staff members say the discussions will lead to an action plan before the project’s data are released to researchers next winter. But tribal leaders are unhappy that these discussions did not begin sooner, and that Native Americans are informally enrolling in the study in the meantime.Announced by then-President Barack Obama 4 years ago, the All of Us study will make anonymized data widely available so the scientific community can use them again and again in open-ended studies. A similar project in the United Kingdom has had remarkable success.All of Us has partnered with Latino and African American organizations, but efforts to engage the Native American community have faltered. With some 600 tribes to consult and a limited budget, “obviously, this is very complicated,” says Gwynne Jenkins, chief of staff for the All of Us Research Program. But Payment says NIH officials, including NIH Director Francis Collins, seemed “naïve” about past problems that make tribes cautious about participating in research studies.One prominent case involved the Havasupai tribe in Arizona, which sued researchers in 2004 after their DNA samples, gathered for diabetes research, were allegedly used to study schizophrenia and inbreeding without permission from the tribe. “Indian communities were treated as specimens in the past. The research was not done in a culturally appropriate way,” Payment says. The Navajo Nation banned all genetic studies in 2002.Meanwhile, All of Us launched nationwide in May 2018, including in cities such as Phoenix that have large populations of Native Americans. As of mid-February, the study already had DNA samples and health records for more than 1600 volunteers who self-identified as American Indian or Alaska Native and were able to indicate their tribe. That’s 1.5% of participants, close to proportional representation of Native Americans.That worries tribal leaders. In August 2018, a report from an All of Us working group of tribal leaders, health experts, and NIH officials said that data from individual volunteers could lead to findings with implications for an entire tribe. The report also suggested an individual participant from a small tribe might be identifiable in spite of data safeguards. Yracheta and some other indigenous scientists add that participation should enable tribes, not just companies, to benefit if data from Native Americans lead to a promising test or treatment.Some tribes believe they should be able to decide whether their members take part in research. “Not all tribes agree. But it raises questions about whether or not it is appropriate to recruit tribal members off reservation when the tribe is not aware that type of recruitment is going on,” says Nanibaa’ Garrison, a Navajo and a geneticist and bioethicist at the University of Washington in Seattle.The working group noted that tribes should have the power to approve publications on their group, a clear explanation of the role of companies in the study, and an opportunity to bless biological samples before disposal. Native Americans should also be part of a special committee that approves research projects focused on this group, the report concluded.Acting on recommendations from the working group, All of Us plans to add a Native American to its research advisory panel. After gathering more input, NIH will decide later this year whether to include already-gathered Native American data in the database.Formal consultations with tribes will ramp up in June in Reno, Nevada, at the midyear meeting of the National Congress of American Indians, which represents many tribes. By September, NIH expects to release a report that describes “things we can do and things that we can’t do,” Jenkins says. She hopes some tribes will eventually invite All of Us to recruit on their reservations. “My aspiration would be that we’re able to develop those kinds of rich, trusting partnerships.” By Jocelyn KaiserMay. 29, 2019 , 1:40 PMcenter_img AMANDA VOISARD/MESA7 MEDIA Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*)last_img read more

80s Cult Classic The Lost Boys to Return as a TV Series

first_imgWhen it comes to the edgy-scary-funny 1987 film The Lost Boys, not only is there a cult following still going strong but its members closely track any news reports on a TV-series adaptation in development. Now, finally, those rumors seem to be true.The CW has ordered a pilot of a series based on The Lost Boys from Rob Thomas, creator of Veronica Mars and iZombie. Warner Bros Television and Gulfstream TV are also involved.Kiefer Sutherland. Photo by Gage Skidmore CC BY 2.0“The CW originally developed a series adaptation of the iconic 1987 Warner Bros horror comedy movie The Lost Boys with Thomas writing during the 2016-17 development season,” reported Deadline. “While the project didn’t go to pilot, the network brass remained very high on the title and had been looking to redevelop it.”This is good news to fans of the film, which stars Keifer Sutherland, Jason Patric, and Jamie Gertz, and was directed by Joel Schumacher.“The Lost Boys fans have gotten used to having their hopes dashed these past three decades. After all, rumors swirled for aeons about a possible sequel where Schumacher would return to direct a bunch of Lost Girls, and that project sadly never materialized,” reported Den of Geek.Jason Patric. Photo by Gage Skidmore CC BY 2.0“But when we heard that Rob Thomas, the man behind both the excellent Veronica Mars and iZombie, was behind a new TV series, we were pretty much immediately on board,” the writer continued.No casting choices have been announced.The original Lost Boys film had the tagline “Sleep all day. Party all night. Never grow old. Never die. It’s fun to be a vampire.” Its plot follows two teenage brothers, played by Jason Patric and Corey Haim, who with their widowed mother move to a California town filled with vampires, led by a sexy “young” gang.Photo by Gage Skidmore CC BY 2.0The film is considered a major influence on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Twilight, and The Vampire Diaries. The young actors in it were largely unknown, and after the film’s success went on to snare major parts in film and TV.In its original incarnation, the young people in the film were meant to be even younger, reminiscent of Peter Pan. The title is a reference to the companions of J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan. But the director, Joel Schumacher, hated the concept of child vampires, and made the characters older and sexier.Peter Pan statue by Sir George Frampton in Kensington Gardens, London.The town of Santa Cruz, California, was used as the location of the film. Several thousand of the locals answered the casting call for extras. Each year the film is screened near the boardwalk that features in the movie in order to enjoy it once more.The movie is also known for being the first one to star the two “Corey’s,” Corey Haim and Corey Feldman. Sadly, Corey Feldman was already using drugs while acting in the film. He is now an advocate for drug addict recovery and for stopping child sex abuse.Schumacher has credited the cast with the reason for its success, not just the young actors but the rest. The older-character parts were played by Dianne Wiest, Edward Herrmann, and Barnard Hughes.It performed well at the box office, earning $32 million. It spawned a novelization and two direct to video sequels.Reviews were mixed. Roger Ebert wrote that the film “Starts out well but ends up selling its soul….the ending of the film is just another one of those by-the-numbers action climaxes in which the movie is over when all the bad guys are dead.”Read another story from us: Beautiful Golden Age Actress Hedy Lamarr Helped Invent Wi-FiBut others credited it with attempting something different at the time. “Instead of having their vampires as stuffy counts in evening dress, producer Richard Donner and director Joel Schumacher take a Peter Pan approach, creating a teenage rock band style vampire,” wrote Cinema Blend.“The Lost Boys has proven to be a classic. The movie has really held up well, and the effects look great compared to modern-day standards.”Nancy Bilyeau, a former staff editor at ‘Entertainment Weekly,’ ‘Rolling Stone,’ and ‘InStyle,’ has written a trilogy of historical thrillers for Touchstone Books, published in nine countries. Her new book, ‘The Blue,’ is a spy story set in the 18th century, published in original paperback, ebook, and audiobook. For more information, go to www.nancybilyeau.com.last_img read more

Hundreds of youth to gather in Newtown for Diocesan World Youth Day

first_imgShareTweetSharePinThe Diocese of Roseau Youth Commission in collaboration with the Parish of Our Lady of Fatima (Newtown) is organizing its annual Diocesan World Youth Day Rally to be held on Saturday April 13, 2019 under the theme “I am the servant of the Lord. May it be done to me according to your word.” (Lk 1:38).The rally will begin at 9:00am with a Parish Missionary Outreach followed by Rally activities on the Newtown Savannah from 11:30am. The day will culminate with a Praise and Worship procession to Our Lady of Fatima Church for the celebration of the Eucharist at 3:45pm.  Mr. Kareem Bertrand, a young adult from the community of Newtown will be the guest speaker during the rally activities.During the parish outreach, youth groups will be visiting the sick and homebound and conducting community service projects in Giraudel, Eggleston, Bellevue, Newtown, Loubiere/Madrelle and Wallhouse/Castle Comfort.Hundreds of young persons from every parish community of Dominica are expected to participate in the rally.  Other highlights of the day include: performances, a Stewardship Photo Scavenger Hunt and dramatization of the Palm Sunday Passion Reading.  All youth and interested adults are invited to join in this chorus of prayer through a day of fellowship, witness, hope and joy in the Lord.last_img read more

New housing for Roseau election victories in all Roseau seats says Skerrit

first_imgShareTweetSharePinDriving through Newtown in the Roseau South constituencyPrime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit has announced that contracts will be signed soon for new housing in Roseau. “In the next weeks, thereabout we will sign an additional set of contracts to build homes in Roseau North, we will build homes in the City of Roseau, we will also build homes in Roseau South, to help alleviate the housing challenge which we have in the City of Roseau, and of course in Trafalgar as well in the Roseau Valley,” the prime minister said recently while speaking at a Mother’s day event.Skerrit said he has many Roseau residents and is aware that they were paying large sums for rent; they have no access to land and sometimes at their age, are unable to obtain a loan from the bank.“This is why the government has made a concerted effort to build homes, as many as possible to ensure that we can provide for families,” he stated. “Those of you who are waiting I will say to you with God’s help, you won’t wait in vain…”Meantime, Skerrit said he is confident his party will win the Roseau seats in the upcoming general election.“Based on my interaction with you and Roseau South,…the Labour Party is going to take that seat… in Roseau North I am confident that we are going to take this seat at the next general elections,” he said. “And from all reports and all indications, the Roseau Central and Roseau Valley are already in the bag.”Skerrit added, “We are very confident as a party, that next election, the DLP will win on a larger margin.”last_img read more

Turkey continues receiving Russian S400 air defense parts

first_imgBy AP |Istanbul | Updated: July 13, 2019 3:59:09 pm Advertising Explained: Why Istanbul Mayor poll result is a blow to President Erdogan Turkey begins receiving Russian missiles in challenge to US and NATO Post Comment(s) Advertising EU slaps sanctions on Turkey over gas drilling off Cyprus turkey, cargo plane, russian cargo plane turkey, russian cargo plane, turkey defence ministry, fighter jets, s 400, united states, us, us administration, nato, world news, indian express news Turkey’s defense ministry tweeted the landing of a fourth Russian cargo plane in Murted Air Base, near the capital, Ankara. (Turkish Defence Ministry)Turkey on Saturday continued receiving components of a Russian-made air defense system, despite Washington’s warnings that it will impose sanctions on the NATO-member country. Related News Acting US Secretary of Defense Mark Esper and Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar spoke by phone. While the Pentagon declined to discuss the call, the Turkish ministry released a statement late Friday, saying Akar stressed that the purchase of S-400 defense systems “was not an option but rather a necessity” due to Turkey’s security concerns.The statement said there was no change in Turkey’s “strategic orientation,” adding that a deterioration in relations would not serve the interests of Turkey, the US or NATO.The minister also emphasized Turkey’s commitment to the F-35 program and repeated a proposal for a joint working group to study how the S-400 system would interact with the fighter jets.The US is concerned the S-400 could be used to gather data on F-35 capabilities if Turkey has both. Turkey’s defense ministry tweeted the landing of a fourth Russian cargo plane in Murted Air Base, near the capital, Ankara. On Friday, the ministry announced the much-awaited delivery of S-400 components had begun.The United States has repeatedly warned it will impose economic sanctions and kick Turkey out of the F-35 stealth fighter jet program if Ankara does not drop its S-400 purchase. Turkey has refused to bow to US pressure, saying its defense purchase is a matter of national sovereignty.The US administration was publicly silent Friday on how it would respond to the delivery, with the Pentagon postponing a news conference.last_img read more

Dartmouth researchers receive grant to study acute kidney injury

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 11 2018Over two million people in the United States undergo cardiac catheterization each year. While the procedure is used effectively for both diagnostic and interventional purposes, it is not without risk: Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in up to 14 percent of all patients following a cardiac catheterization and up to 50 percent in patients with pre-existing kidney disease. When AKI occurs, patients have an increased risk of cardiovascular events, prolonged hospitalization, end-stage renal disease, and even death. A research team led by Dartmouth Institute Associate Professor Jeremiah Brown, PhD, MS, recently was awarded a $3.5 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to test preventative interventions through a virtual learning collaborative with or without automated surveillance reporting (ASR).”We know there are widely accepted interventions–ones that our group and others have contributed to–that can help prevent AKI in patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. The problem is that these interventions are rarely implemented,” Brown says. “So, the critical research question is not what hospitals should do but how to get them to do it.”Brown says previous work by the team, which was funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, has demonstrated the feasibility and potential effectiveness of virtual learning collaboratives to increase the use of AKI prevention protocols: In an earlier 10-hospital pilot trial, use of an AKI prevention toolkit comprised of three core preventative interventions led to a 28 percent reduction in AKI. The team’s previous work–funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs–also has demonstrated the potential effectiveness of ASR which provides near real-time feedback to frontline care workers.Related StoriesResearch highlights persistent gaps in quality of care for patients with chronic kidney diseaseBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryNew imaging probe allows earlier detection of acute kidney failureTwenty hospitals throughout the country have agreed to participate in the cluster-randomized trial. Each hospital will receive one of the following interventions for 18 months: technical assistance, technical assistance with ASR, virtual learning collaborative with team-based coaching, and virtual learning collaborative with ASR. Each hospital site will receive the AKI prevention toolkit. The group, which includes researchers from the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and The University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, hypothesizes that clinical teams in a virtual learning collaborative will reduce incidence of AKI following procedures compared to technical assistance intervention–both with or without ASR.The hospitals will continue to enroll patients following the 18-month intervention period for an additional 18 months post-intervention with technical assistance, automated surveillance reporting, and virtual learning collaborative interventions removed, so that the team can evaluate whether the reduced incidence of AKI will be sustained for each of the randomized clusters during the post-intervention phase.”We think that this trial not only has the potential to improve the quality of care for the over two million people annually undergoing cardiac catheterizations, but that the findings could help hospitals implement a wide array of preventative interventions that could dramatically improve patient care and outcomes. Our findings could also reduce healthcare expenditures from AKI complications which cost the U.S. health system $1.2 billion annually,” Brown says. Source:https://tdi.dartmouth.edu/news-events/research-team-receives-grant-for-research-prevent-acute-kidney-injurylast_img read more

Age is the strong predictor of regaining independence after surgery for hip

first_img Source:http://www.lww.com/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 26 2019Most middle-aged and older adults recover their ability to live independently within a year after surgery for hip fracture, reports a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.Even patients older than 80 are usually able to resume living independently – although they’re less likely to regain independent walking ability, according to the new research, led by Emil H. Schemitsch, MD, of University of Western Ontario. Dr. Schemitsch and colleagues write, “Identifying factors associated with living and walking independently following hip fracture may help surgeons better identify which patients are at risk and optimize care of patients with this injury.”What Factors Predict Recovery of Function After Hip Fracture Surgery?The study included over 600 patients aged 50 or older who underwent surgery for a common type of hip fracture – fracture of the femoral neck. Patients were drawn from the recently completed FAITH (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures) randomized controlled trial. That study compared two types of bone screws (cancellous screws versus a sliding hip screw) for fracture repair in 1,079 patients from 81 clinical sites in the United States, Canada, Australia, the Netherlands, Norway, Germany, the United Kingdom, and India. The new analysis included only patients who were living and/or walking independently before they fractured their hip.To be included in the new analysis, patients also had to have one-year follow-up data on whether they had returned to independent, non-institutionalized living and independent walking, without any type of walking aid. The goals of the study were to descriptively quantify patients’ changes in living status and use of walking aids over the one year after hip fracture and identify factors predicting a greater chance of returning to independent living and independent mobility.One year after hip fracture, three percent of patients aged 50 to 80 years at the time of surgery were living in some type of institution, as compared to 20 percent of patients older than 80. Of those who were walking independently before hip fracture, about 34 percent of 50- to 80-year-old patients required some type of walking aid, as did 69 percent of those in the over-80 group.Related StoriesExperts explain what happens after hip fracture in older adultsBordeaux University Hospital uses 3D printing to improve kidney tumor removal surgeryOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchAge 50 to 80 was a strong predictor of returning to independent living and independent walking one year after hip fracture surgery. Patients with good fitness before surgery (ASA physical status class I) and current nonsmokers were also more likely to regain independent living and independent walking ability within one year after hip fracture.Patients who were not using a walking aid before their hip fracture and those having “acceptable” hip implant placement were also more likely to return to independent living. Predictors of independent walking included living independently before fracture, having a non-displaced fracture, and not needing revision surgery.Hip fractures are a common type of “fragility fracture,” affecting an estimated 1.6 million people globally each year. For many older adults, hip fracture leads to decreased mobility, reduced ability to perform activities of daily living, and loss of independence.The study helps the orthopaedic care team to better understand what factors affect the chances of recovering independence and mobility after surgery for a femoral neck fracture. The results suggest that most patients aged 50 to 80 will be able to live and walk independently in one year after hip fracture. Patients over 80 also have a good chance of returning to independently living, although they are likely to need some kind of walking aid.In addition to age, previous physical fitness, smoking, certain fracture characteristics, and undergoing revision surgery to the hip also affect the chances of regaining independence. Dr. Schemitsch and colleagues conclude: “Identifying factors associated with living and walking independently following a hip fracture may help the orthopaedic community better identify which patients are at risk for loss of independence and mobility following a hip fracture, and ultimately help to optimize the care of patients with this type of injury.”last_img read more